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THE 1953 P&S 




PUBLISHED BY THE FOURTH YEAR CLASS OF 
THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK 



The Oath of Hippocrates 

IjSWJ^HR by Hpollo the physician, & Hesculapius, & Hygeia, 
and Panacea, and all the gods and goddesses, that according to 
my ability and judgment I will keep this oath and this stipinV 
tion: to reckon him who taught me this Hrt equally dear to me as 
my parenrs, to share my substance with him and relieve his necessities 
if required; to look upon his offspring as my own brothers and to teach 
them this Hrt, if they shall wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation; 
and that by precept, lefture, and every other mode of instruction I will 
impart a knowledge of the Hrt to my own sons and those of my teachers, 
and to disc'ples bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of 
medicine, but to none others. I will follow that system of regimen which 
according to my ability and judgment I consider for the benefit of my 
patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous. I 
will give no deadly medicine to anyone if asked, nor suggest any such 
counsel; and in like manner I will not give to a woman a pessary to pre 
duce abortion. With purity and with holiness I will pass my life and 
praftise my Hrt. I will not cut persons laboring under the stone, but 
will leave this to be done by men who are practitioners of this work. Into 
whatever houses I enter I will go into them for the benefit of the sick 
and will abstain from every voluntary aft of mischief and corruption; & 
further, from the seduftion of females or males, of freemen and slaves. 
Whatever, in connection with my professional praftice or not in connec 
tion with it, I see or hear in the life of men which ought not to be spoken of 
abroad,I will not divulge, as reckoning that all such should be kept secret. 
While I continue to keep this oath unviolated may it be granted to me 
to enjoy life and the praftice of the Hrt, respefted by all men & all times. 
But should I trespass and violate this oath may the reverse be my lot. 



DEDICATION 





YALE RNEELAND, JR. 

This frontiersman in infectious diseases 
likes to speak to us from another age, just a 
few decades ago, when lobar pneumonia was 
the principal winter scourge; a time when 
the doctor's ear-pieces transmitted "the mew- 
ing of sea gulls" and "the creaking of new 
leather." 

The years bring swiftly into prominence 
newer methods and other diseases. But the 
gracious accents of this man are mostly im- 
portant for us because they reveal a nobility 
that can be present in every age, ours too. His 
is an easy, modest elegance, unashamed of 
speaking well and doing well, and of leaving 
uncovered some of the great warmth that is 
within him. 





Willard Cole Rappleye 

A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Med.Sc.D. 

Dean 



Aura Edward Severinchaus 

A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Dean 



Flynn, Fertig, Gregersen. Lewis, Hickey. McCormick. Klinck, Rappleye, Severinghaus, Mcintosh, Clarke, Detwiler. van Dyke, Rose, Loeb 










WrM9 


W? ,4 




Kk 




Dorothy H. Andersen 
Pathology 



Virginia Appar 
Anesthesiology 



THE FACULTY SECTION 




Georpe F. Cahil 
Urology 




Wilfred M. Copenhaver 
Anatomy 



In one of his teaching sessions Dr. John K. 
Lattimer of the Department of Urology, suggested 
to us that when we were in practice we might find 
it helpful to draw up a list of those in our com- 
munity whose advice we might seek in the solution 
of particularly difficult problems. 

This impressed us. So much so that, rather than 
follow the pattern of faculty sections in previous 
yearbooks, we decided to apply Dr. Lattimer's sug- 
gestion to our present community and to draw up 
such a list for this annual. We have listed, there- 
fore, some of the instructors whom we have en- 
countered during the past four years with their 
primary medical interest. 

Unfortunately, we have been drastically limited 
by space and hence can include here only a rela- 
tively small proportion of the faculty. 

\\ e would like to express our deep thanks to the 
Departments of Anatomy, Dermatology, Medicine, 
Obstetrics. Pathology and Surgery for aiding us in 
our compilations. In all cases, however, the final 
choices were our own. 




Stuart W. Cosiiiiff 
Medicine 



ANESTHESIOLOGY 

Vircima Apgar Transplacental drug passage 

Duncan A. Holaday Arterial pH ; acid-base balance 

Emanuel M. Papper Barbituate metabolism; analgesics 

Daniel P. TausiG Deliberate hypotension 




jA 



Donato A. D'Esopo 
Obstetrics and Gynecology 



Goodwin L. Foster 
Biochemistry 



Richard L. Day 
Pediatrics 




Cushman D. Haajrensen 
Surgery 



ANATOMY 

Frederic J. Acate Endocrinology 

Wilfred M. Copenhaver Experimental embryology 

Samuel R. Detwiler Experimental embryology 

Herbert 0. Elftman Histochemistry 

Adolph ELWYN Neuroanatomy 

Charles A. Ely Endocrinology 

Earl T. Engle Gynecological pathology 

Fred A. Mettler Neurophysiology 

Charles R. Noback Histochemistry; anthropology 

George K. Smelser Opthalmology; exophthalmos 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Erwin Charcaff JSucleic acids in cancer 

Hans T. Clarke Proteins; bacitracin 

Zacharias Dische Lens proteins in cataract 

Goodwin L. Foster Methylamine metabolism 

Michael Heidelberger _ Immunochemislry 

Forest E. Kendall Lipids in arteriosclerosis 

Seymour Lieberman Steroids 

Karl Meyer Mucoproteins; hyaluronidase 

Edgar G. Miller Proteins 

David Rittenberc Protein synthesis; cholesterol 




Franklin M. Hanger 
Medicine 



Harold D. Harvey 
Surgery 



Ruth C. Har 
Pediatries 





Virginia K. Frantz 
Surgery 



Wilson C. Grant 
Physiology 




David Shemin Citric acid cycle; porphyrins 

Warren M. Sperry Lipoproteins 

DERMATOLOGY 

George C. Andrews Cutaneous malignancies 

Leslie P. Barker Clinical dermatology 

Rhoda W. Benham Fungus disease 

J. Lowry Miller Skin injections 

Carl T. Nelson Electrolyte changes; sarcoid 

Meyer H. Slatkin Syphilis 

MEDICINE 

James B. Amberso.n Tuberculosis 

Henry Aranow. Jr. Thyroid disease; myasthenia gravis 

Dana W. Atchi.ey ..Clinical medicine 

ALVAN L. Baruch I'ulmonary disease 

Stanley E. Bradley Hepatic and renal physiology 

Stuart W. Cosgrief Thrombotic phenomena 

Andre Cournand Cardiopulmonary disease 

Robert C. Darling Physical medicine 

M. Irene Ferrer Electrocardiography 

Edward E. Fischei Rheumatic disease 



Magnus I. Gregersen 

Physiology 





David V. Hal.if 
Surgery 




George H. Humphreys 
Surgery 



Joseph W. Jailer 
Medicine 



Elvin A. Kahat 
Microbiology 




:uuuk. 




Donald W. Kinfi 
Pathology 



Abbie I. Knowllon 
Medicine 



Charles A. Flood Gastroenterology 

Alfred GellhORN Chemotherapy oj cancer 

Marcel Goldenberc. ..Nor-epinephrine ; pheochromocytoma 

Alexander B. Gutman Metabolic disease 

Franklin M. Hanger Liver disease 

Joseph W. Jailer Clinical endocrinology 

Julia M. Jones Tuberculosis 

Yale Kneeland, Jr Infectious disease 

Abbie I. Knowlton Hypertension 

Daniel L. Larson Immunochemistry oj cancer 

Robert L. Levy Cardiology 

Robert F. Loeb Metabolic disease 

Irving M. London Porphyrin metabolism; isotopes 

Michael J. Lepore Gastroenterology 

Gilbert H. Mudge Electrolyte metabolism 

IsiDOR MuFSON Peripheral vascular disease 

George A. Perera Hypertension; adrenal disease 

Kermit L. Pines Hypertension 

Calvin H. Plimpton Parathyroid disease 

Charles A. Racan Rheumatoid arthritis 

Helen M. Ranney Hematology 

Dickinson W. Richards Cardiopulmonary disease 

David Seegal Chronic disease; nephritis 

William H. Sheldon Constitution 

I 



gjfjy^ -9 



Robert F. Loel> 
Medicine 




Harry M. Rose 
Microbiology 



7 




Lawrence W. Sloan 
Surgery 



Byron Stookey 
Neurological Surgery 



Arthur 1*. Stout 

Pathology 




Rustin Mcintosh 
Pediatrics 



Beatrice C. See^al 
Microbiology 



1 





H. Honstan Merrill 
Neurology 



Phillip Polatin 
Psychiatry 





William B. Sherman Allergy 

John V. Taggart Renal metabolism 

Joseph C. Turner Hematology; malignant disease 

Kenneth R. Turner Cholesterol metabolism 

Rene Wecria Cardiology 

Paul Wermer Clinical endocrinology 

Sidney C. Werner Thyroid and pituitary disease 

JOHN R. West III Cardiopulmonary disease 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Seymour P. Halbert Antibiotic-producing bacteria 

Cl.AUS W. Jungeblut Poliomyelitis 

Ei.vin A. Kabat I mmunochemistry 

John D. MacLennan Clostridia toxins 

Robert H. Muller Influenza virus 

Harry M. Rose Virology; infectious disease 

Beatrice C. Seecai. Cytotoxic nephritis 

Gregory Schwartzman Hypersensitivity 

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY 

Lester A. Mount Cerebral circulation 

J. Lawrence Pool Cerebral vascular and psychosurgery 

Joseph Ransohoff Psychosurgery 

John E. Scarff Hydrocephalus 

III 




Howard C. Taylor 
Obstetrics and Gynecology 



Carmine T. Vicale 
Neurology 



Aimer Wolf 
Neurology 




Drs. Ely and Elftman 

Edward B. Schlesinger Disc lesions 

Byron Stookey Neuroanatomy; peripheral nerves 

NEUROLOGY 

Sidney Carter Convulsive disorders 

Bernhard Uattner Neurosyphilis 

Paul F. A. Hoefer Electroencephalography 

H. Houston Merritt Clinical neurology; spinal fluid 

Joseph Moldaver Electromyography 

David D. N. Nachmansohn 

Neurochemistry ; neurophysiology 

Henry A. Riley Clinical neurology ; neuroanatomy 

Carmine T. Vicale Clinical neurology 

Theodore J. C. von Storch Migraine; multiple sclerosis 

Drs. Turner, Gellhnrn and Rannev 




OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

Charles L. Buxton Hormonal replacement therapy 

Donato A. D'Esopo Urinary incontinence and fistulas 

Saul B. Gusberg Precursors oj genital tract cancer 

Howard C Moloy Pelvimetry 

Harold Speert Thyroid physiology 

Charles M. Steer Electrohysterography 

Howard C. Taylor Uterine cancer 

Gray H. Twombly Cancer oj the ovary and uterus 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 

John H. Dunnington Clinical ophthalmology 

LeGrand H. Hardy Physiological optics 

Otto Lowenstein Glaucoma 



Fran k Payne Visual fieldl 

Charles A. Perera Clinical ophthalmology 

Algernon B. Reese Retrolental fibroplash 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

Robert E. Carroll Surgery oj the hand 

Harrison L. McLaughlin Frozen shoulde\ 

Alan de F. Smith Skeletal tuberculosis 

Frank E. Stinchfield Arthritis oj the hi\ 

OTOLARYNGOLOGY 

Frantz Altmann Carcinoma oj the laryni 

Edmund P. Fowler Meniere's diseasf 

Jules Waltner Chemistry oj perilymph 




Drs. di Martini, Ragan and Melcher 

PATHOLOGY 

Dorothy H. Andersen Celiac syndrom* 

Margaret Bevans Arteriosclerosis; hepatic cirrhosis] 

Lester R. Cahn _ Oral pathology* 

Robert W. Coon Blood coagulation] 

David Cowen Neuropatholog 

Joseph E. Flynn Blood coagulation] 

C. Zent Garber Orthopedic pathology] 

Homer D. Kesten Hematology] 

Donald W. King Cellular physiology] 

Paul Klemperer Collagen disease 

Marvin Kuschner Tuberculosis] 

(Continued on page lO^J 

Drs. Riley, Nelson and Seegal 

PI 

■■ -.« 





PRE-CLINICAL YEARS 



V^*v*"<*» 




FIRST YEAR CLASS 




CLASS OFFICERS 

President Charles Donaldson 

Vice-President William Healey 

Secretary-treasurer Claire Liacliowitz 

Honor Chairman Morey Wosnitzer 



^rr rival 



Having paid our fees, we were planted in 
the sanctified soil on the fifteenth day of Sep- 
tember, nineteen hundred fifty two anno 
Domini, to be nurtured through four winter 
solastices, ripened to the peak of medical per- 
fection, and finally harvested (or cut down 
to size) in four years. 

We hadn't even learned our ventral aspects 
from our dorsal before we were swept into 
a weekend of welcome that left little to be 
desired. Upperclassmen guided us through 
the hallowed hospital halls and gave us our 
first glimpse of lecture amphitheatres where 
we were soon to spend very many, very 
cramped hours. A cocktail party followed the 
tours and, after a few sips, the faculty was 
warmly welcoming everyone to the medical 
school, upperclassmen and all. 

By now we were beginning to feel at home, 
which means we were on friendly enough 
terms with the school to refer to it by its ini- 
tials. Perhaps we should have been suspicious 
when the second year students were so easily 
crushed in our softball game the next day. 
They turned out to be in such poor physical 
condition that they hardly lasted the seven 
innings, and then only after frequent trips to 
the well of cold canned beer. Perhaps we 
should have wondered about the processes 
that had so weakened the fibre of these fel- 
lows. If only we had been advised of the 
decussation of the pocketbooks, along with 
that of the pyramids! And how were we to 
know the same Dr. Elftman who introduced 
us to the fifth member of our dissecting group 
("at least one member is contributing some- 
thing to the progress of medicine") would 
soon be analyzing the devastating little bumps 
on sketchily drawn curves, following each 
examination. 



Quickly it piled up. Dr. Noback rotated 
the gut, while overlapping professors lec- 
tured hash. "King Farouk" abdicated his pro- 
jection throne to demonstrate his famed supra- 
trochlear lymph node. And we listened to 
"hawt saounds" with Dr. Rogers, and saw 
one thousand and one slides. 

But this was only the beginning. We were 
still to be Copenhaverated, Elwynated, mar- 
rinated, chiasmized, sanforized, and finally 
pulverized, by a novel form of the Inquisition 
known as the second quarter. After long hours 
in the anatomy lab having a "little look at 
this and a little look at that," we learned that 
the little look at this and the little look at 
that really weren't too important — besides, 
everything is psychosomatic these days. Any- 
way, didn't Father always want us to go to 
law school? 

But in order to maintain the balance pre- 
scribed for an embryonic physician, we forced 
ourselves to take part in some leisure time 
activities: a class party (the beer ran out 
early, and Lucky Lou and his boys soon fol- 
lowed), a rather painful basketball game 
against Cornell Med's first year (they just 
don't abide by the Sanity Code), and endless 
rubbers of bridge. 

However, there is one thing that came out 
of this hectic period that we hope will be 
solid and permanent, and about which we feel 
considerable personal pride. It is the Honor 
System we established. Although it represents 
the efforts of members of the previous classes 
too, we are happy to have had such an im- 
portant part in the foundation of this new 
tradition. 




After the applications, 
interviews and accept- 
ances, came registration 
and reception week at 
P&S. 




After smiles at the book 
store . . . the bill! 



ourd 




lMJt\jOA 





Sports, bridge tourna- 
ments, and midnight de- 
baucheries — part of our 
strict self -discipline for 
the maintenance of a 
well-rounded personal- 
ity. 




c\ 




> *i 







I SEl DR. DETWILER, 15 AT IT /\(?AINl" 



U\*r!? 





"We are all brothers under the skin." 



First row: Dick Co pen haver, Bruce Lewis, Kurt Kohn, Nancy Dearmin, Donaid Dubin, Hans Baruch, Edith 
Bramwell, F. E. Council, Paul Black, Charles Chastain, Mio Fred land. Second row: Saran Jonas, Fred Kati, 
Robert Buker, Ralph Gentile, Wayne Myers, Kenneth Ganem, Edgar Haber, Wendell Hatfield, Lee Clark, Susan 
Carver, Dave Andrews, Robert Osnos, Jea nnette Hovsepian, Howard Radwin. Third row: Neil Clements 1 Charles 
Donaldson, Edward Burka, Jerry Jacobs, Raymond Bartlett, James Casey, Peter Barry, Byron Hardin, Peter 
Gam me I la, Anne Crosby, Patrick McLoughlin, Sandy Fairer. Fourth row: Jaroslav Hulka, J ere Davidson, F. K. 
Curtis, Nat Taylor, Vincent Hogan, Keith Dawson, Ed Futterman, Arthur Green, Bernard Edelstein, Putnam 
Brodsky, Bob Gilbert, Leo Dunn, Al Borland. 





Durt. 




SECOND YEAR CEASS 




'We arc not concerned with marks at P&S." 



The first class gathering took place on Wednes- 
day evening, September 8th. when a zealous group 
assembled to plan a four-day period of organized 
intimidation known as ""first-year orientation." 
After a heated and lengthy debate, it was voted to 
hold the first annual first-year-upperclass Softball 
game on Saturday instead of Sunday and the meet- 
ing terminated. Any first-year student foolhardy 
enough to seek advice from more than one 
"orienter" received earnest, lengthy and completely 
conflicting discourses. On only one point was there 
complete unanimity: the first year would be rough 
but it was of trifling difficulty compared to second 
year. 

The international set, many loafers and some 
toilers, assembled on the 13lh to commence the 
fearsome second year. Vie were rapidly introduced 
to the '"germ theory of disease" by Dr. Harry Rose 
and the redoubtable Dr. H. P. Smith held forth on 
the fine art of pencil sharpening. 




Three-dimensional movies. 



The first few CPC'c were overrun by hordes of 
eager students bearing pearl books, which promptly 
resulted in restriction of the protocols to the third 
and fourth-year men. 

The first path quiz came and Dr. Flynn read in 
about ten minutes an encyclopaedic answer he al- 
legedly composed in only two. 

The bacti lab exercise, titled simply "students 
bleed one another," turned out to be just that. 

During the World Series, a large segment of 
the class became organized into vociferously par- 
tisan groups, these groups becoming reorganized 
and more vociferous as the election campaign 
picked up steam. A granuloma formed about Wil- 
son and Griswold, becoming encapsulated after 
the election (and perhaps a bit caseous). 

Dr. Howe made his debut the morning of the 
first bacti exam and delivered a magnificently ab- 
struse lecture, topped only by his next one. 



Seated: Ray Wunderlich, Dick Brunstetter, Dave Berman. Mark Winfield. Ed Rudinger Warren Leeds. Second row: 
Dick Naeye, Daniel Pettee, Pete Rowley, Jim Worcester, Bob Stuckey, Dan Leary, Al Gordon, Simon Ohanessian, 
Bob Roth. Third row: Pete Westerhoft, Dick Herrmann, Maurice Van Besien, Bill Lovekin, Thorpe Kelly, Ben 
Watkins, Tom Anderson. Fourth row: Henry King, Stanley Bergen, Bard Cosman, Dudley Rochester, Bill Everett, 
Scott Halstead, Henry Rogers, John Griswold, Arthur Verdesca, Elias Kaimakliotis. 




A group of about a dozen individuals pulled 
away from the field in the bacti question-asking 
competition, but it was a tossup for the lead. 

Dr. Flynn pointed out the pitfalls of berry 
picking as we moved into a more complex area of 
pathology. After the weekly quiz, he drove the point 
home with an eloquent recitation of a piece of verse 
written by "an obscure pathology instructor." prob- 
ablv while writing the answer to a weekly quiz with 
the other hand. 

At the second student bleeding, it was obvious 
that many people had gained valuable experience 
from their first trial — they had Dr. Rose do this 
one. 

The second bacti exam came and during the pre- 
ceding hour Dr. Ellison upheld the fine tradition 
of the Department of Microbiology by completely 
befuddling everyone on the subject of complement. 




"All a teacher ran do is point out the 

facts." 



Lying: Bob Rawcliffe. First row: Hal Spalter, Nathan Kosovsky, Jim Ranck, Harvey Resnik. Felix Battat, Mai Lai. 
Bob Siegel, Alan Kaplan, Bob Best. Second row: Harriet Halpern, Jane Heitmann. Lestra Carpe, Sylvia Robinson 
Shirley Mahew, Uerr.tr. King, Ellen Newman. Jan Elderkin. Third row: Walt DeVault, Charles Griege John 
Schullinger, Gurstin Goldin, Barney Miller, (Duer.tin DeHaan. Marilyn Heins, Anne Bingham, Doiier Fields, Bill 
Ciaravino, Alan Feld, Dave Sampson, Tracy Scudder, Bob Sheridan. Fourth row: Bob Eisinger, Dave Marshall, 
Bob Langmann, K. Y. Lum. Dick Rifkind, Alex Milyko. John Wilson. Andrew Frantz, Dick Pierson. Paul Adams. 
Howard Taylor. Fifth row: Pete Debevoise. Dick Cruess, Jerry Renthal, Don Marcus, Dick Eberly, Art Gordon. 
Norm Cobert, Jim McCartney. Al Masi. Hank Rosett, Don Brown. Dorsey Mahin, Fred Wheelock. Burt Polansky, 

George Nesbitt. 





"Dr. Howe, may I ask a question?" 



In November, attendance at local and not-so-local 
football games dropped as exams began to come 
fast and furiously. As usual, the bacti department 
lead off, this time with an objective item pithil) 
described by Dr. Rose as "a real give-away," who 
gave what to whom not being specified. By this 
time, anyone who missed even one word of the 
staph, strep or pneumococcus lectures had malaise, 
anorexia, low-grade fever and a marked headache. 
Dr. Howe officiated beforehand as usual. 

The path department followed this up with one 
of its quarterly marathons. The path notebooks 
were handed in for the first time and returned 
about a week later with no comment. A few enter- 
prising souls approached instructors and asked for 
criticisms. At this time, anyone in the vicinity of 
an instructor going over a notebook with a red- 
faced student was liable to pick up such choice com- 
ments as: ". . . all of your nuclei look alike . . ." or 
". '. . complete lack of proportion . . ." or ". . . why 
don't you sharpen your pencil occasionally . . ." 




Pathology? 




'You don't hare to draw anything as 
far as I'm concerned!" 




*M** 





'The affected tissue may be hard, soft, 
cystic, friable, yellow, red, gray . . ." 





Virgin ia-in - Wonderland. 



In a close vote, the class approved a faculty sug- 
gestion to take a four-day Thanksgiving weekend. 

Don Broun just edged out Dr. Rose to win the 
question-asking championship in bacti. 

The hardier members of the class who turned out 
for the medicine-pathology class before the bacti 
final were electrified by Hank Rogers' dive from 
about the middle of Amphitheatre H to the first 
row. He was halted there by some fancy headwork 
by Dave Berman plus rapid footwork by Thorpe 
Kelly and several others. 

After the last bacti lecture. Dr. Rose coolly di- 
vulged the number and nature of the final exam 
questions, which immobilized some individuals and 
stimulated others to frenzied activity. 

The pathology department was debilitated as first 
Dr. Stewart and then Dr. Smith fell into the awful 
clutches of the surgery department. The class ex- 
pressed its sympathy by sending (lowers to both 
and, in addition. Dr. Smith was presented with a 
book of drawings by another great proponent of 
medical art — Leonardo da Vinci. 



A n dv-in ■ Wonderland. 



After the final, the class celebrated with a sherry 
(not too dry — just medium) party (?) which was 
enlivened by the musical activities of Chuck Tule- 
vech and his Glee Club. 

Fittingly enough, bacteriology was replaced by 
six courses of assorted sizes and shapes but path 
just kept rolling along. The clinical path labs 
soon made us yearn for the good old days of 
bacti. This lab was unique in that both instructors 
and reagents were elusive and, when located, neither 
was generally of much help. 

"Smilin' Jack" Smith returned from Thanksgiv- 
ing vacation with a magnificent periorbital hema- 
toma. Story given out was that his girl hit him 
with a rock encysted in a snowball. 




Blasts? 





"What did you say the Sahli uas?' 



"Your turn next, George." 




The class almost gave up hope that the Bishops 

would ever have a baby. We understand that Bob 
and the Mrs. had a spat and, although the baby 
was expected in the first week of December, she re- 
fused to deliver until he apologized. He's so-o-o 
stubborn! 

Class meetings were held at the drop of a hat — 
Dick Elias announced everything but the time of 
day. 

Drs. Gilman and Wolff vied for the title of "Most 
Words Spoken Per Lecture.'' What was really need- 
ed was a combination of the two courses: Alfred 
giving a practical demonstration of his drugs to 
keep us awake while Abner showed all those pretty 
landscapes. 



"Even in the seals of the mighty . 




"What's at the Uptown tonight? 




"Take it easy, Fred, he's not a class- 
mate!" 




Path quiz tomorrow. 





'Lucky Pierre." 



And if they write more than two blue 
books, take off 10 points!" 



Although better known for his sartorial and medi- 
cal achievements, Dr. Flynn labored mightily in the 
cause of English education with both his student 
charges and Dr. Calvin Plimpton. Dr. Plimpton 
stubbornly persisted in mispronouncing such com- 
mon words as syndrome and autopsy, and misspell- 
ing such equally common words as mucocoele. Let 
it be said to his credit, however, that he gave an 
extremely apt definition of hysterectomy. 

Gurst Goldin officially opened the social season 
with a party at which the males, led by "John Bar- 
rymore" Resnik, were overwhelmed at charades by 
the more adroit females. 

Second-year students were easily recognized 
around P&S by their dearth of equipment and 
portable reference books. The average load carried 
by a certain segment of the class consisted of pearl 
book, Merck's Manual, a synopsis of pathology, 
an otoscope and ophthalmoscope, a hemocytometer, 




Class party. 

and it was reputed that one would-be XYZ (honor 
fraternity) member was seen toting a portable 
EKG machine. 

'"Coolest Move of the Year" award goes to Bill 
Everett for putting in four hours in path lab on 
the morning of his wedding day — the last class 
before Christmas, no less. Not a hair out of place 
either. 

John Heggie and Don Merriam limped down to 
Florida and back in John Zabriskie's renowned 
"'Zabmobile" I the "Tan Beetle") to attend the 
Christmas nuptials of Bob Stuckey. Bob is very 
enthusiastic about his wife's culinary skill, espe- 
cially that corn bread. 

Last ones down to breakfast at Bard every morn- 
ing at about 8:58: Nam, Kosovsky, Resnik, Miller, 
and Vang, in that order. 

Chalk up another record for the class of '55 — 
more visits to the student health office than any 
other class that Dr. Lamb can remember. 




H. P. and friend. 



i 

r. 




1 ^H \ . 





Second-year syndrome. 




l+ij&jgi 






---:-<^>^ 



EXTRACURRICULAR LIFE 



Officers 





THE P & S CLUB 

In 1928 when P & S moved from the "old 
school" downtown to its present home on 
168th Street, students whose homes were not 
near the medical center lived wherever they 
could find rooms or apartments. The same 
year the YMCA, recognizing the need for a 
student center, purchased the premises which 
are now 100 Haven Avenue and converted 
them into a combined residence hall and ac- 
tivity headquarters. It was here that the P & S 
Club, a student branch of the YMCA, made 
its uptown beginning. 

Because of the obvious inadequacies at 100 
Haven, the "Y" spent over one hundred thou- 
sand dollars for restoration — a significant 
contribution to the needs and welfare of P & S. 
The work had hardly been completed when 
$2,300,000 of the Harkness gift was made 
available for the construction of Bard Hall. 

With the opening of 50 Haven Avenue in 
1928, the university authorities gratefully 
recognized the earlier contributions of the 
YMCA by providing a rent-free suite of rooms 
on the eleventh floor of Bard Hall for P & S 
Club activities. From this headquarters at 
Bard, the club assumed primary responsi- 
bility for nurturing the extracurricular life 
of its members — the entire student body of 
P & S. Since that time it has pursued this 
course in many different spheres, including 
social, educational, religious and charitable 
activities. 

Today the club has a student president, 
vice-president and secretary elected by club 
membership and a director salaried by the 
YMCA. There is also a faculty advisory board 
which meets twice a year with the student 
officers. The planning and implementation of 



the program is done by interested students, 
with anyone welcome to lend a hand or idea. 

The social and amusement program in- 
cludes semi-weekly movies, theater parties 
(six to eight a year), intiamural basketball 
and squash, a square dance, and the two big- 
gest social events of the school year, the 
Christmas Party and the Spring Festival. 

Educationally, a monthly speaker is se- 
cured and usually speaks on a non-medical 
subject. There is also a library of records, 
magazines and book. 

Our new director, Chilton MacPheeters, has 
revived interest in religious subjects and, in 
addition to weekly Bible study gatherings, he 
has led a semi-monthly discussion group and 
brought several religious speakers to Bard 
Hall. Future plans in this area include a 
seminar on religion and medicine with out- 
standing men in both fields as guest speakers. 

For the past four years the Benefits Com- 
mittee of the club has collected used books, 
clothing, and lab equipment and upwards of 
81,600 in cash to aid Salonika Medical School 
of Thesalonika, Greece. This aid has been 
gratefully acknowledged and our hope is that 
it may be a valuable contribution to the re- 
building of the school. 

Because of yearbook's perennial financial 
insecurity and the need for some continuity 
between staffs which put out the annual each 
year, the P & S Club this year helped to sub- 
sidize the book and made its staff a perma- 
nent special committee of the club. 

This year more than 500 medical students, 
nurses, staff members and guests took part in 
programs of the P & S Club. These activities 
were made possible only through the efforts 
and the interest of those who organized and 
carried them out. 




BARD HALL 



The shouting and laughter die, the last bal- 
loon is burst, an empty glass rolls under a 
sofa, and quiet settles over the bare lounge. 
So ends another gala party at Bard Hall, but 
the happy memories of a class show, a P&S 
Club ball, live music from the Bards or our 
own bands, or a skit by Duhl linger on. A 
half-day of inertia, then activity picks up, 
the lounge again filling with furniture, stu- 
dents, newspapers, cards, and TV. 

This was our unique dormitory and recrea- 
tion center, Bard Hall. Perched on the brink 
of the Hudson, reflecting the sunsets and 
myriad lights uptown and down, our home lay 
aloof, yet within easy reach of busy Manhat- 
tan. For the studious there were lectures and 
silence; for the athletic, squash and swim- 
ming; and for the social, song and dance — ■ 
all right at hand. Only a short hop away there 
was also the bustle, glitter, and intrigue of 
New York culture beckoning. Classmates came 
here from across the nation and the world; 
Sevvy's pins speckled the map. Living was 
comfortable, eating was convenient, friends 
envied our luxury. Harvard had come close, 
Cornell and LIU were drawing up plans, but 



nobody but nobody could rival the P&S haven 
on Haven Avenue. 

That was what our visitors saw; the many 
of us who lived at Bard saw that and more 
too. We had our mail and calls sorted by the 
charming Freddie, rooms arranged by the 
industrious Mary, meals and repartee dished 
out by the effervescent Stella, under the varied 
reigns of the C's, Mr. Thorns, and now the 
Jack Hickeys. During our time we saw bottles, 
paper, and even a student fly out the window, 
heard explosions and bagpipes in the hall- 
ways, breathed the heady aroma of Chanel 
and Mixture #405, tasted thin beer and small 
pies, and felt the biting fall wind as we headed 
off to classes. We scanned the bulletin board 
for roof parties, movies, tickets, sport tour- 
naments, textbooks sold, rides wanted, notes 
lost, gloves found, and invitations to local 
dances. All this we saw and enjoyed as an 
integral part of our daily curriculum of labs, 
quizzes, clinics, and ward routine. 

A bright potpourri of activity, a surpris- 
ing continuation of former college days, 
Bard Hall will ever remain a fond remem- 
brance of our internships and later careers. 





First row: Norman Hill, Janet Kuehner, Sylvia Robinson, John Ramsdell, Chairman. Second row: Edward Maynard, 
Richard Cruess, John Brodsky, Robert Engler. 




STUDENT-FACULTY SOCIAL COMMITTEE 

The Student-Faculty Social Committee is a group of students which plans 
the monthly cocktail party and dinner that precedes the regular meeting of 
the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Society. To this group go the thanks of 
the remainder of the student body for making possible these informal meet- 
ings of students and faculty. 



THE STUDENT'S COUNCIL 

This group is a representative body of students whose primary function 
is to confer with the administration of the school. It evaluates new proposals 
and attempts to represent the student's point of view in matters of mutual 
interest to faculty, administration and student body. The Council is com- 
posed of the class officers, with the president of the senior class acting as 




Sitting: King, Liachowiti, French. Standing: Healey, Kaplan, Donaldson, Elias, Fay, Bennlnghoff, 



First row: John Ramsdell, Neville Grant, Glen Larger, President; Poter Westerhoff, Secretary; Robert Engler. 

Second row: Fred Whitcomb, Sylvia Robinson, Norman Hill, Janet Kuehner, Al Cannon. Absent members: Martha 

Adams, James Hastings, Edgar O'Neil, Robert RawcMff. 




RESIDENTS' COMMITTEE 



This is ihe fifth year for the Bard Hall Residents' of one elected member from each floor of Bard and 
Committee, which was established as a liaison for four members, one from each class, appointed by 
the student residents of Bard Hall and the Resi- the Dean. It functions to promote an adequate life 
dent Manager and Dean. The committee consists for the residents and good will between them and 

the administration. 



Stan Yickers, Chairman 

Jim Miller Jim Thorpe 
Pierce Smith Pete Ways 



THE 1953 FIND 



Directed by five members of the fourth-year class, the 1953 Fund is a 
class-sponsored insurance, and endowment project. Its purpose is to aid in 
the payment of medical expenses of any member who is forced to withdraw 
from school or leave his internship for reasons of health. The fund expires 
in June of 1954 and at that time the money not used will be given to the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons as a gift from the Fund's members. 



THE GLEE CLUB 



This year the Glee Club, under the talented leadership of Gene Goldberg, 
again delighted audiences at Bard Hall functions. The professional produc- 
tion and artistic blending of light with more serious songs brought hearty 
applause to the performers and rheir director. Now the ripe age of three, 
this harmony of voices from Bard and Maxwell Halls looks forward to 
brightening many a Christmas and Spring party with its ambitious repertoire. 




First row: Mathias, Bamhouse, Carter, McDonald, Pettee, Moore. Second row: Hastings, Terry, Thompson. 
Third row: Hogan, Salerno, Hill, Durfey, Good kind. 



THE BARDS 



The warm fellowship of life at Bard Hall and at 
P&S is well exemplified in the activities of the 
Bards, a happy group of songsters who delight 
many with their variety of interpretations from 
Bach to Cole Porter. Dwight Morss first conceived 
the idea of a fraternity of medical minstrels in 
1946. Since that time the Bards have traditionally 
held tryouts in the early part of each year and 
elected a small group of first-year men to replace 
the graduating members. The latter men become 
part of an active Bards Alumni who join with the 
student members several times each year at the 
Christmas Party, the Spring Festival and the an- 
nual alumni spring picnic and dinner to renew 
old songs and old times. 



From the impetus given them by Founder Morss 
and with the help of fine leadership from Art Hall 
and Jim Hastings, the Bards have gained an envi- 
able reputation as entertainers par excellence, not 
only about the Medical Center but also in women's 
colleges throughout the East. The Bards can be 
proud, too, of the two record albums they have cut. 
These met with such success that they are making 
plans for a third waxing. 

For all their popularity, the Bards modestly 
claim that they are merely a group of baritones 
and basses who have found, through conscientious 
rehearsal and the stimulus of an invitation to sing, 
the happy means to melodious four-part harmony. 




AMORAL CHORAL AND DISHWASHING SOCIETY 



Sometime Members 
Joe Alpers 
Fred Duhl 
Stan Edelman 
George Edison 
Paul Errera 
Jim Hastings 
Jim Miller 
Bill Mohler 
Stan Olicker 
Bob Richie 
Jim Terry 
Pete Ways 
Ben Wright 



Several years ago, in the days before night duty 
and part-time lab jobs, assorted members of the 
Class of 1953 passed their evenings in gainful 
employment in the Bard Hall Dish Room. It soon 
became apparent that this hardy band possessed 
more than the meer technical skill required for 
washing dishes. They could, or at least did, sing. 
And so, carefully nurtured in those cultured sur- 
roundings, there arose a new organization dedi- 
cated to better things in music — and washing dishes. 
Thus was born the A. C. & D. W. S. 

Unfettered by any requisites of musical skill, the 
Choral grew in enthusiasm and in strength. Soon, 
at countless class parties and P&S Club festivals, 
the student body was subjected to harmonious ren- 
ditions of such classics as "Teasing" "Cold Water" 
and "Don't Hit Your Mother, Boys," topped off 
with an inevitable "My Cutie's Due on the 222." 

With the tribulations of the clinical years upon 
it the Choral is no longer active. However, present- 
day occupants of the Dish Room report that rarely, 
late of a winter's evening, the off-key strains of 
"Eddeystone Light" can be heard mixed with the 
rumble of the dish-washing machine. The spirit 
of the Amoral Choral sings on! 




First row: Gerald Renthal, James Rathe, James Ranck, Keith Dawson, Louis Scian, Walter Riester, Paul Black, 
Daniel Benninghoff. Second row; Fred Klipstein, Neville Grant, Charles Grieg, Scott Halstead, Walter DeVault, 
Thomas Anderson, George Nesbitt, Merrill Bradley, Doiier Fields. Third row: Peter Westerhoff, James Garvey, 
Treasurer; John Ramsdell, President; William Bernart, Vice-President; William Everett, Peter Rowley, Secretary; 
John Griswold, John Wilson. Fourth row: Roger Jelliffe, Howard Nay, William Chastain. James Hastings, Edward 
Burka, Edwin Brown, Stanley Bergin, Olivar Cobb, James Worcester, Benjamin Watkins, Howard Taylor, Milton 
Potter, Jerry Dickinson, Fred Whitcomb, Julian Smith. Fifth row: Arne Skilbred, Richard Eberly, Phillip Baum- 
gartnef, Thomas Bradley, John Jackson, Foster Conklin, Thorp Kelly, Richard Cruess, Pierce Smith, James Terry, 
George Cahill, Charles Tulevech. Sixth row: Jere Davidson. Jerry Hulka, Neil Clements, Fred Pasternack. Joseph 
McNaniel. Dudley Rochester, Robert Hollister, Donald Gleason, Richard Pnckett, William Haynes, Lawrence Bugbee, 
Alfred Azzoni, David Palmer, Henry Rogers, Robert Langmann, John Brodsky. Absent members — 4th Year: Stanley 
Einhorn, Herman Grossman, Ronald Pfister, Norman Hill, William Mohler, James Neely. Armistead Nelson, Gary 
Rapmund. Colin McCord, William Rotton, Eugene Shekitka. Ernest Vandeweghe. 3rd Year: Edward Angell, William 
Caldwell, Paul Davidson, James Hanway, Thomas Holland. Paul Keating, Edgar O'Neil, Donald Reisfield, Robert 
Salerno, Harold Stocker, Herbert Swartz, James Taylor, Kent Young. 2nd Year: Joseph Bilbao, Andrew Frantz, 
John Heggie, Lawrence Krotzer, Richard Pierson, Armstead Robinson, George Selly, Fred Wheelock. 1st Year: 
David Andrews, Roy Brown, Al Burland. Fred Curtis, Charles Donaldson, Thomas Federawiti, Robert Goodale, 
William Healey, Vincent Hogan, Burton Lee, Carl Meier, Phillip Miller, Thomas Moore, Louis Putnam, Howard 
Radwln, Joseph Silverman Howard Tyson, Richard Waller Morey Wosnitzer. 

NZN 

THE OLDEST MEDICAL FRATERNITY 
AT COLUMBIA 



Nu Sigma Nu weathered the storm of elec- 
tion year and, along with most of the rest of 
the nation, felt it had come out ahead when the 
balloting was over. Under the energetic su- 
pervision of its president and other officers, 
the fraternity's undergraduate members de- 
rived the maximum enjoyment and edification 
out of their fellowship this year. 

Balance was the keyword of the year's ac- 
tivities as members tensely balanced beers 
amidst hilarity and an occasional tear as the 
television carried scenes of an Ike landslide. 
Balance was the word as Nu Sigs clutched 
their cocktail classes in anticipation of Dr. 
Plimpton's reaction to Dr. Flynn's presenta- 
tion of "A Hitherto Unknown Disease." Bal- 



ance, too, marked the rest of the year's pro- 
gram, which included numerous fraternity 
dances and the annual inter-chapter dance; 
several highly successful dinner gatherings 
followed by entertaining and informative 
speakers; and outdoor activities in the form 
of a mid-winter skating foray and a spring 
baseball game. 

The Iota Chapter was represented at the 
National Convention in Chicago by its presi- 
dent, who managed to make Columbia's voice 
heard on many issues of chapter importance. 
With a foundation of interested and active 
members, Nu Sigma Nu can look forward to 
maintaining its role as a social and educa- 
tional outlet of importance at P & S. 




Officers 
President: John Ramsdell 

Vice-President: William Bernart 

Treasurer: James Garvey 

Secretary: Peter Rowlev 




K Mr ~ 


^p* HHP^i £- 




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K« >-~V^ 


x3B 



ox 



Dedicated to the promotion of scholarship 
and fellowship, Phi Chi International has 
shown unparalleled growth and development 
throughout its sixty-four years. Beginning with 
the merger of local groups at the University 
of Vermont Medical School and the Univer- 
sity of Louisville School of Medicine, it has 
risen to a total membership which now ex- 
ceeds 35,000 with over 5,000 collegiate mem- 
bers in fifty-seven active chapters in some 
thirty states and Canada. 




PHI CHI: WORLD'S LARGEST MEDI- 
CAL FRATERNITY 

The monthly dinner lecture series is a fra- 
ternity favorite. This year it featured Dr. L. J. 
Goldwater, who discussed his service with the 
World Health Organization; Dr. Rene Wegria, 
who spoke on the importance of intellectual 
and philosophical thought among people in 
the medical field; and Dr. Harold Brown, who 
outlined the problems involved in the estab- 
lishment of a medical school. 

The social life of Phi Chi was kept in full 
swing by frequent dances and informal par- 
ties. Outstanding social functions of the year 
included the P&S interfraternity post-Christ- 
mas dance and the twice-yearly interchapter 
dances with the Cornell, Long Island and 
New York Medical College groups. Promi- 
nently assisting in the monthly social events 
were the wives of Phi Chi members, newly 
christened "Phi Chettes," who have added a 
real spark to our social affairs. 

The fraternity members' enthusiasm was evi- 
denced by the rebirth this year of the "Doodle 
Dope," the official Phi Chi newspaper, which 
covers many of the issues involving the na- 
tional fraternity and maintains contact with 
alumni members, thus serving as a unifying 
force for all of the Upsilon Sigma members 
of Phi Chi. 





Presiding Senior: Franklyn Newmark 
Presiding Junior: Robert Engler 

Secretary: Maxwell Lai 



Treasurers: 



Samuel Silipo 
and Daniel Leary 



First row: Max Lai. Bill Ciaravlno, Harvey Resnick, Jim Thorpe, 
Robert Engler, Frank Newmark, Sam Silipo, Dan Leary. Second 
row: Alan Kaplan, Harold Hoops, Jerry Litisky, Norm Cobert, 
Mark Winfield, Dan Pettee Al Masi Tracy Scudder. Third row: 
Clyde Wu, Don Watt, Vincent Butler, Quentin DeHaan, Ed Rudinger, 
Dick Rifkind, Arthur Gordon, Si Ohanessian, Bob Gilbert. Fourth 
row: Fred Lagomarsino, Bob Sheridan, Byron Hardin, Paul Gulyassy, 
Court Robinson, Hugh King, Ralph Gentile, Ron Feldman, Dick 
Mil ward, Gardner Fay. Fifth row: Felix Battat, Russ Randall, Jim 
Fee ley, Ralph Richter Jim McCartney, Frank Council, A I Cannon, 
Bob Milam, Mike Garcia. Absent members — 4th Year: Clayton 
DeHaan, Robert Leeper, Jack Oppenheimer, Douglas Richards, 
William Targgart, Howard Thompson, William Van Duyne, James 
Ware. 3rd Year: Walter Bonney, Dick Hayes, William Muir. Douglas 
Pennoyer, Bob Pottinger, John Vecchiola. 2nd Year: Robert Bishop, 
Don Brown. Robert Rawcliffe, Joseph Stocks. Ray Wunderlich, Rich- 
ard Elias. 1st Year: Peter Barry, Ray Bartlett. James Casey, Richard 
Copenhaver, Jerry Jacobs. Richard Kaufman, Robert Maslansky, 
Patrick Mc Lough I in, Jerome Montana, Vernon We net, William 
Winner, John Leddy. Charles Sickles. 




Phi Delta Epsilon came into existence in 
1903 and it was but four years later that the 
Columbia chapter was founded. The frater- 
nity is nationally strong with fifty chapters 
in medical schools throughout this country 
and with thirty post-graduate clubs. The na- 
tional enrollment is 12,500, of which 1,100 
are medical students at the present time. 

Under the guidance of Consul Sherwin 
Kevy and his officers, Phi Delta Epsilon has 
completed a most successful year at P&S. 

In addition to frequent business meetings, 
the social sphere has been filled with numerous 
small gatherings held at Bard Hall. These 
have proven to be an excellent source of en- 
tertainment on lonely Saturday nights, both 
.for the single and married members. The 
highlight of the social activities was the an- 
nual Inter-Chapter Dance held in the spring. 

Academically, Phi Delta Epsilon was also 
active. Dinner meetings with various members 
of the P&S staff serving as speakers brought 
enlightening information to our members in 
a pleasant manner. The highlight of the lec- 
ture series was the annual Clay Ray Murray 
Honorary Lecture. 

Front row: H. Spatter, G. Goldin, M. Zimmerman, S. 

Kosovsky, M. Jassie, B. Miller, B. Cosman, H. Rosett. E. 

S. dicker, H. Poch, J. Markowitz, S. Vickers, H. Schwa 

N. Kolomeyer 



<f>AE 



FOR ADVANCEMENT OF FRIENDSHIP 
AND KNOWLEDGE 



Officers 



Consul: 


Sherwin Kevy 


V ice-Consul : 


Marvin Lipman 


Scribe: 


Hal Spalter 


Treasurer: 


Arthur Like 



Kevy, A. Like, L. Cramer, R. Herman. Back row: N. 
Gordis, R. Milch, R. Osnos. Absent members: O. Krieger, 
tz. M. Skolnick, M. Lipman, G. Kleinfeld, R. Silbersweig, 
, T. Robinson. 





Sealed: Mohle 



Perna, Barlow, Benninghof*. Standing: Zimmerman, Eddy, Randall, van Hoek, Cahill, 
Bank, Olicker, Johnson, Cramer. 



Members 
Philip Aisen 
Arthur Aronoff 
Norman Bank 
Carl Barlow 
Daniel Benninghoff 
George Cahill 
Lester Cramer 
Robert Eddy 
Paul Johnson 
Edwin Maynard 
Jay Meltzer 
William Mohler 
Marian Molthan 
Stanley Olicker 
Vincent Perna 
Russell Randall 
Pierce Smith 
Robert van Hoek 
Marvin Zimmerman 



ADA 



Alpha Omega Alpha is a medical honor society, 
admission to which is based entirely upon scholar- 
ship. Organized at the University of Illinois in 
1902, the society now has seventy-two chapters at 
schools in the United States and Canada. 

The chapter at P&S had its beginnings in 1907. 
At this year's annual fall lecture, Dr. Rollin D. 
Hotchkiss of the Rockefeller Institute presented his 
recent work on bacterial transformations. The 
spring symposium discussed and evaluated forms 
of financial aid to medical education. 




First row: E. Maynard, J. Garvey, N. Grant, J. Foster, E. Wheaton. V. Parna. Second row: L. Cramer W. 

Bernart W. Ciaravino. J. Ramsdell, P. Westefhott. J. Worcester, R. Langmann A Franr Third row: R. Milch. 

M Bradley R. Holllster P. Davidson, L. Bugbee R, Engler. A Kaplan, G. Cahill, P. Smith. Fourth row: N. 

Kosovsky G. Potter M. Lai. G- Fay, A. Cannon, R. Pierson, J. D.mon, H. Rogers, A. Phmney. 



THE OMEGA CLUB 



The Omega Club is a society composed of forty- 
five undergraduate members from the second, third 
and fourth year classes, faculty members and 
about six hundred graduate physicians practicing 
throughout the country. It was founded in 1892 
and its activities have alternated between academic 
and social functions. During the past few years 
they have been chiefly social and have consisted 
of several cocktail parties each year and an annual 
banquet. 



Class of 1953 
Merrill Bradly 
John Bryant 
George Cahill 
Lester Cramer 
Joseph Dimon 
Stanley Einhorn 
Gardner Fay 
Edwin Maynard 
Robert Milch 
William Mohler 
Vincent Perna 
Arthur Phinney 
Milton Potter 
Pierce Smith 

Class of 1954 
William Bernart 
Larry Bugbee 
Alfred Cannon 
Paul Davidson 
Robert Engler 
James Foster 
James Garvey 



Neville Grant 
Robert Hollister 
Paul Keating 
Richard Milward 
John Phillips 
John Ramsdell 
James C. Taylor 
Earl Wheaton 
Kent Young 

Class of 1955 
William Ciarvino 
Richard Eberly 
Andrew Frantz 
Alan Kaplan 
Nathan Kosovsky 
Max Lai 

Robert Langmann 
Barney Miller 
Richard Pierson 
Henry Rogers 
Peter Rowley 
Howard Taylor 
Peter Westerhoff 
James Worcester 



THE YEARBOOK STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief 


Dick Michaels 


First Year Staff 


Associate Editor 


Bob Milch 


Charley Donaldson (Editor) 


Senior Editor 


Gardner Fay 


Leo Dunn 


Activities Editor 
Art Editor 


Jim Miller 
Fred Duhl 


Ron Feldinan 
Mio Fredland 


Business Manager 
Advertising Manager 
Circulation Managers 


Mike Garcia 
Vince Perna 
Julie Crocker 


Arthur Green 
Jerry Jacobs 
John Leddy 
Pat McLaughlin 


Literary Staff 


Scootie Dimon 


Xuan Truong 


Joe Alpers 
Sylvia Davies 
Vivi French 


Photography Staff 


Second Year Staff 
Don Marcus 


Ed Housepian 


Jack Burnham 


Harvey Resnik 


Bob Leeper 
Roy McDaniels 


Jay Goodkind 
Gene Gottfried 


Third Year Staff 
Martha Adams 


Twig Michaels 
Marian Molthan 
Jim Miller 


Hal Hoops 
Paul Johnson 
Dick Kaufman 


Pearce Browning 

Bob Engler 

Kevin Hill (Editor) 


Jim Neely 


Ronnie Pfister 


David Palmer 


Jim Thorpe 




Joan Weiss 


Jim and Lucy Ware 




Katie Wood 


ted: Michaels, Crocker, French, 


Milch. Second row: Palmer, Marcus, Res 
row: Miller, Thorpe, Fay, Hoops, Burnham. 


nik, Perna, Johnson, Garcia. Third 





THE CLINICAL YEARS 



SAFE on 1 lllltll 



OR 



Miracle on 168th Street 



Remember that intelligent, vivacious, handsome, alert, imaginative, 
sophisticated, creative, zealous, mature, courteous, kind, obedient, cheer- 
ful . . ., and vet humble and overlv modest second-vear class of last vear? 



Well, here we are again! 



We now have the bearing of 
clinicians. White coats droop 
affectionately around our sag- 
ging scapulae. The collars and 
cuffs are frayed. The stetho- 
scope has moulded into an 
auscultatory fetal position to 
fit the pocket. The reflex ham- 
mer twirls delicately about a 
knowing finger. Our pockets 
are fuller, our feet are flatter. 
Gone are the days of textbook 
drudgery. Now we hear those 
gentle voices calling, 

"NEW ADMISSION! MAKE 
TRACKS!" 





In short, this third year 
isn't an utter Utopia. Compli- 
cations will arise. Just to give 
you an idea of what we've run 
up against since last year, 
here's our interval note. 



CHIEF COMPLAINT 



This class of 1954, these scintillating wits, 

Have, speaking psychiatrically, become a trifle schiz. 

By which we mean dichotomies among us have been bred- 

I.e., the spectre ARGUMENT has reared its ugly head. 




The surgeon, imperturbable, relying on incision, 

To remedy those parts of us that sometimes need revision 

Scoffs at the internist and calls his methods frail 

Charging that more oft than not he rests upon his reputation 

Replying to this acid charge the eighth and ninth floors say, 

"Preoccupation with the knife s a morbid kind of play." 



Aloof to this cmbroglio, in his libido reveling, 
Leers the psychoanalyst reclining on his innerspring. 
He can, the jerk, relax and smirk because he knows, by Freud, 
That man projects on fellow man and really is annoyed 
By those whom he pretends to help. 




From Earnest Internists 



Seated: Anneliese Sitan Pat Dalhouse, Ronee Herrmann, Dick Hays, Martha Adams, Joan Weiss, Hope Craig, 
Doris Pennoyer. Second row: Jim Rathe, Pearce Browning, Gene Gottfried, John Durfey, Hugh King, Dave Read, 
Sherwin Kevy, Doug Pennoyer. Third row: Gene Goldberg, Lonnie MacDonald, Rod Carter, Roger Jelliffe, Dick 
Milward. Paul Gulyassy, Vinnie Butler, Hal Stocker, Bob Engler, Glenn Lenger. Fourth row: Joe Mackie. Bill 
Haynes, Phil Brickner, Bob Pottenger, Herb Wohl, George Hogle, Jim Hastings, Henry Holle, Al Anoni, 

Sill Bernart. 



Kneeling: Nev Grant. Roger DesPrei, Andy Healey, Foster Conklln, John Jackson. Don Dallas, Roy Vagelot, 
Tom Bradley. Sam Silipo. Second row: Earl Wheaton, Artie Like Hal Hoops, John Ellison, Paul Davidson, Freddie 
Klipstein, Babe Loughridge. Ken Altman, Dave Barnhouse, Enoch Gordis. Jim Feeley, Dick O'Connor, Kevin Hill. 
Third row: Al Cannon, Phil Baumgartner, Joe McDanlels, Jim Foster, Jim Garvey, Bob Hollister, Dick Prickett, 
Larry Bugbee, Four Hearts, Double, John Ramsdell, Dave Palmer. 




To Virgin Surgeons. 




The surgeon is a scourge 
Who merely gives expression to a deep sadistic urge. 
The internist is similar — he simply sublimates 
And gently treats the patients whom he actually hates. 




"The answer," says the analyst, "is really very plain 
If one adheres to principles of pleasure and of pain. 
One must transcend the obvious, the deeper meanings shoiv, 
And as we treat the psyche so will the soma go." 



The sides are clearly stated but the question isn't solved. 

In fact it only seems to get increasingly involved. 

Between, betwixt, ive find we're mixed, not sure who's friend or foe, 

For one rants on defending con, the other argues pro. 

And so we're left, of hope bereft, our ideas in collision. 

Our major grief, we call it chief complaint, is indecision. 



PERSONAL HISTORY 




Conviviality and cooperation 
still outstanding characteristics. 
Individual personalities refresh- 
ing as always. Marriage a fre- 
quent phenomenon. 



M.m Cannot Live by Bread Alone. 





Good to the Last Drop 




'What's a three letter word 
for remunerate 'f^ 



Me too.' 



ALLERGIC PHENOMENA 




< 










'Plus 138 from llie Solid South . . 



In case of a tie . . 



Marked exaccerbation of symptoms ev- 
ery four years, ranging from anaphyl- 
actic state ( Conklin-Coles syndrome) 
to mild rash (Theurkauf type). Spon- 
taneous remission the rule. Prescribed 
diet for therapeutic failures — crow. 




The Lonely Ones. 



To the Victors. 



PRESENT ILLNESS 




In bed with 




Put that camera away or I'll . . 



Protean manifestations ranging from gluteal 
ischemic necrosis and diurnal narcolepsy (be- 
fore and after lunch) to OPD varicosities and 
ward round stasis. Shifting dullness has been 
observed on numerous occasions. Vague GI 
symptoms (borborygmi syndrome) have re- 
sisted all current forms of therapy except five 
meals a day and frequent ski weekends. Der- 
matologic and gynecologic consults have failed 
to shed any light upon the underlying mecha- 



nisms. 



Impression: Idiopathic tertiary non-essential 
degenerative craniolithiasis (rocks in the 
head) . 

Suggest: A problem for Public Health. (This 
is a terrible disease.) 

F. Hanger, c.c. 




"Remember, be heallhy in public." 




Stir nicely, ,\icely-jNicely. 



Tell us about prostates, Dr. Mittleman. 




"So then Palmer inserted the sig- 
moidoscope. " 





^i • 


1 


m 


f 


m 



a 





\ 



At last! We're in! 



SOCIAL HISTORY 




Chief residence 50 Haven Ave. Eleven 
flights, three-flight dyspnea same for 
three years. Elevators in the basement. 
One-fourth married, apparently hap- 
pily. Three-fourths getting restless. At 
least seven children. Occupations: the 
show goes on . . . Maestro Goldberg 
. . . impresario Lipmann . . . "Twinkle- 
toes" Bernart of the insecure bra- . . . 
not to mention all the other troopers 
. . . "Barrel-staves'' Foster's 30 kilo- 
meter jump, subsidized by the fracture 
service, we're told . . . those more at- 
tuned to the arts and the plunking of 
ukes. 



Les Syphilids 




'It woollies niv nerves." 




\\ hal are we'i 



C e 



Tlie best 



bruins 




The iIm^mh'/iv of craniolilhiasis is 
simple for an expert 




Bear up, Daisy 



.'"V. 



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i 



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And just around the corner . . . 






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Rooftop river view 



THE FOURTH YEAR 



CLASS OFFICERS 



FIRST YEAR 

Pres Pierce Smith 

Vice-Pres George Cahill 

See.-Treas Julie Schoepf 

SECOND YEAR 

Pres James Miller 

Vice-Pres Jack Bryant 

Sec.-Treas Vivi French 

THIRD YEAR 

Pres Jack Bryant 

Vice-Pres Gardner Fay 

Sec.-Treas Vivi French 

FOURTH YEAR 

Pres Dan Benninghoff 

Vice-Pres Gardner Fay 

Sec.-Treas Vivi French 



Class may be defined as "a body of students 
meeting regularly to study the same subject," or 
as "a group of persons having common charac- 
teristics." The former definition more appropriately 
applies to the Class of 1953. for its members are 
perhaps best characterized by individuality and 
diversity, not only of background, but also of per- 
sonality and purpose. The common denominators 
of this group are the experiences of four years at 
P&S, for to some extent we all faced the same 
hurdles, studied for the same exams, laughed at 
the same jokes and aspired to similarly exalted 
goals. 

In our first two years we were presented with a 
wealth of basic information, much of which we 
remember, but much of which we would not, or 
could not, retain. For some, these were years filled 
with the exciting revelation of new knowledge; for 
others they were a tedious round of required as- 
signments, unrelieved by any glimpse of that rea- 
son for our medical careers, the sick patient. 

^ ith our clinical years, most of us found the 
justification for our efforts, as we met those ideals 
of our pre-clinical days, the patient and the clini- 
cian. From both we frequently derived knowledge 
and sometimes inspiration, as we learned more of 
the processes of disease and the importance of 
dealing with the patient as a whole. Presented with 
boundless facilities, we have begun to learn the 
science of medicine and, for those who would 
glimpse it, something also of the art of medicine. 

On the following pages are recorded some of 
the events and activities of the Class of 1953. We 
have emphasized accounts of the individuals who 
make up our class with, among other things, their 
stated special medical interest. It is our hope that 
these pages will recall the four years at P&S for 
us all, not only in the Spring of 1953, but also in 
those years ahead, when we shall no longer meet 
'"regularly to study the same subject."' 




PHILIP AISEN 

Internal Medicine 
A.B., Columbia 
New York City 




y >*+ mm 




JOSEPH B. ALPERS 


ARTHUR E. ARONOFF 


Internal Medicine 


Psychiatry 


A.B., Yale 


A.B., Columbia 


Salem, Mass. 


New York City 



DANIEL W. BENNINGHOFF 
Internal Medicine 

A.B., Yale 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 





MERRILL N. BRADLEY 

Surgery 

A.B., Princeton 

Birmingham, Ala. 




GEORGE C. BR\AN 

Psychiatry 

A.B.. Williams 

A.M., Harvard 

Ph.D.. Harvard 

Henderson ville, N. C. 









4 





NORMAN BANK 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., New York University 

New \ ork City 



CARL M. BARLOW 

Maxillofacial Surgery 

A.B., New \ ork University 

D.D.S., Columbia 

New \ ork City 




ROBERT L. BEILMAN 

General Practice 

BiS., Fordham 

Hollis, N. Y. 





JOHN H. BRYANT 

Internal Medicine 
A.B., Arizona 
Tucson, Ariz. 







ROBERT N. BUTLER 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Columbia 

]New York City 




JOHN P. BURNHAM 

Surgery 

A.B., Southern California 

Los Angeles, Calif. 





*e** *** 




GEORGE F. CAHILL 

Internal Medicine 

B.S., Yale 

Suffern, N. Y. 



ANA LIVIA CORDERO 
General Practice 
B.S., Puerto Rico 

Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 




LELAND B. COWAN 

Surgery 

Utah 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



ri 




SYLVIA A. DA VIES 

General Practice 

A.B., Mount Holyoke 

Confers, N. Y. 




CLAYTON R. DeHAAN 


PIERRE deREEDER, JR 


Surgery 


General Practice 


B.S., Florida 


B.S., Columbia 


Orlando, Fla. 


Hackensaek, N. J. 





'iSV ^* 




LESTER M. CRAMER 

Maxillofacial Surgery 

D.M.D., Tufts 
West Hartford, Conn. 




«^ «•* ^ 




JULIE S. CROCKER 
Anesthesiology 

A.R., Vassar 

A.M., Columbia 

Dublin, N. H. 





ARTEMIS N. DAMASKINIDOU 

Pathology 

A.B., Smith 

Salonika, Greece 



S. JEROME DICKINSON 

Surgery 

A.B.. Harvard 

A.M., Harvard 

Grosse Pointe, Mich. 



^fr*^** 





JOHN C. DiJOHN 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Columbia 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 




JOSEPH H. DEMON, III 

General Practice 

B.S., University of the South 

Columbus, Ga. 



2* W& 








FREDERICK J. DUHL 

Psychiatry 

A.B., Columbia 

New York City 




VERA V. FRENCH 

Psychosomatic Medicine 

A.B., Bryn Mawr 

A.M., Radcliffe 

Ph.D., Radcliffe 

Davenport, Iowa 




d 



ROBERT H. EDDY 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Maine 

Bangor, Maine 



MIGUEL A. GARCIA 

Surgery 

A.B., Amherst 

Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 





STANLEY EDELMAX 

Surgery 
A.B., Columbia 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



JAMES W. GEARHART. JI 
Surgery 
B.S., Rutgers 
Xew ^ ork City 




Hi 




GEORGE R. EDISON 

General Practice 

A.B., Columbia 

New York City 




STANLEY L. E1NHORN 

Pathology 

B.S., Western Reserve 

Cleveland, Ohio 



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GARDNER F. FAY 

Surgery 

A.B., Harvard 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



THURMAN B. GIYAN, JR. 

Pediatrics 

B.S., Pittsburgh 

New ^ ork City 






ROBERTA VI. GOLDRING 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Vassar 

New York City 







U *•- T' 



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JAMES R. GOLUB 

Internal Medicine 

B.S., Yale 

New York City 



M. JAY GOODKIND 
Internal Medicine 

A.B., Princeton 
Williamsport, Pa. 






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I 



HERMAN GROSSMAN 

Pediatrics 

A.B., North Carolina 

A.M., Wesleyan 

Fort Lee, N. J. 



X 



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JOHN C. HARDIE 
Orthopedic Surgery 

A.B., Ohio State 
Y onngstown, Ohio 



HORTON A. JOHNSON 

Surgery 

A.B., Colorado 

Colorado Springs, Col. 



- 




PAUL K. JOHNSON 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Hamilton 

Plainfield,N.J. 




ry *w$* <j$y 




SEYMOUR KALECHSTEIN 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Brooklyn 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 











NORMAN A. HILL 

Neurological Surgery 

A.B., Princeton 

Cincinnati, Ohio 







EDGAR M. HOUSEPIAN 

Surgery 
A.B., Columbia 
New York City 



GEORGE A. HYDE 

Surgery 

A.B., Williams 

New Castle, Del. 




;■/» 



JOSEPH S. KARAS 

Pediatrics 

A.B., Columbia 

Lawrence, Mass. 



4» <* v 




RUTH E. KERR 

Neurological Surgery 
A.B., Barnard 
New York City 




> 



. 



RUDOLPH E. KLARE 

General Practice 

B.S., Columbia 

West Englewood, N. J. 







/ 







5? *** 



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OSCAR J. KRIEGER 

General Practice 

B.S., C. C. N. Y. 

Fairlawn, IN. J. 



LEWIS KURKE 

Psychiatry 
A.B., Columbia 
New York City 



ARTHUR G. LARKIN 

Internal Medicine 
A.B., Columbia 
New York City 



JOEL MARKOWITZ 

Psychiatry 

A.B., Cornell 

New York City 










HOWARD W. MARRARO 

Pediatrics 

A.B., Columbia 

New York City 



EDWIN P. MAYNARD, III 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Williams 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



n 



•> *- 




ROBERT D. LEEPER 

Internal Medicine 

B.S., Idaho 

Lewiston, Idaho 




JOANNE LLOYD-JONES 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Smith 

New York City 




S 



\ 



JEROLD M. LOWENSTEIN 

Internal Medicine 

B.S., Columbia 

New York City 




M 



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COLIN W. McCORD 

Surgery 

A.B., Williams 

Chicago, 111. 




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LeROY W. McDANIEL 

Surgery 

A.B., Columbia 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 



JAY I. MELTZER 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Princeton 

Queens, N. Y. 



, I ^^ s~* 






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RICHARD H. MICHAELS 

Pediatrics 

B.S., St. Lawrence 

Canton, N. Y. 



WARNER NASH 

Gynecology and Obstetrics 

Washington University 

Lansdale, Pa. 



« 








I 




ROBERT W. MILAM 

General Practice 

U. of North Carolina 

Surrv, Maine 



JAMES C. NEELY 

Surgery 

A.B., Princeton 

Harrisburg, Pa. 










ROBERT A. MILCH 

Orthopedic Surgery 

A.B., Columbia 

New York Citv 







I. ARMISTEAD NELSON 

Surgery 

B.S., University of the South 

Birmingham, Ala. 




- ' 




JAMES Q. MILLER 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Haverford 

l UckullOt*. \. \ . 





WILLIAM C. MOHLER 
Internal Medicine 

A.B., Yale 
South Euclid. Ohio 




MARIAN E. MOLTHAN 

Internal Medicine 
A.B., Smith 
Wayne, Pa. 



"RANK.LYN M. NEW MARK 
General Practice 
A.B., Columbia 
Brooklyn. N. ^ . 



* 



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is 



/ 

> / 



JOHN G. NORK 

Internal Medicine 
A.B., Columbia 
Shenandoah, Pa. 





STANLEY OLICKER 

Pediatrics 

A.B., Columbia 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 





JACK H. OPPENHEIMER 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Princeton 
East Orange, N. J. 




ALVIN E. OSULLIVAN 
General Practice 
B.S., C. C. N. Y. 
Woodside, N. Y. 







VINCENT P. PERNA 

Pathology 

A.B., Wesleyan 

Orangeburg, N. Y. 




HERBERT E. POCH 

Pediatrics 

A.B., Columbia 

Elizabeth, N.J. 




M. GROSVENOR POTTER, JR. 

Gynecology and Obstetrics 

A.B., Princeton 

Buffalo, N. Y. 



JAMES J. QUINN 

General Practice 

B.S., Columbia 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 




^* ^ "x 



1/ 



RONALD R. PFISTER 

Surgery 

A.B., Harvard 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. 





^ 




ARTHUR O. PHINNEY, JR. 
Internal Medicine 

A.B., Harvard 
^ incliester, Mass. 



ERIC A. PLAUT 

Psychiatry 

A.B., Columbia 

New York City 



RUSSELL E. RANDALL 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Princeton 

Merrick, N. Y. 






i 







GARY RAPMU.ND 

Pediatrics 

A.B., Harvard 

Toronto, Canada 



G. DOUGLAS RICHARDS 

General Practice 

A.B., Syracuse 

Butler, Pa. 



ROBERT H. RICHIE, JR. 

General Practice 

A.B., Haverford 

New York City 





WALTER H. RIESTER 

Surgery 

A.B., Colgate 

Collingswood, N. J. 




*3* «*^ 






/ 



FLETCHER P. RILEY 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Chicago 

Racine, Wis. 



ALICE K. SCHORR 

Pediatric Psychiatry 

A.B., Oberlin 

New York City 




HAIYIM SCHWARZ 
Internal Medicine 

A.B., Columbia 
Los Angeles, Calif. 







EUGENE SHEKITKA 

Surgery 

A.B., Columbia 

Olyphant, Pa. 




t 



WILLIAM N. ROTTON 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Yale 

New ^ ork Git} 







. COURTLAND ROBINSON 

Medical Missionary 

A.B., Princeton 

Elizabeth, N. J. 



* 



. *•""" W 




MILLARD C. SAPPINGTON 

General Practice 

A.B., Columbia 

Orangeburg, N. Y. 




MARVIN SKOL.NTCK 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Princeton 

New ^ ork City 



W. PIERCE SMITH 

Internal Medicine 

B.S., Yale 

Fort Lee, N. J. 



ROSCOE V. STUBER 

Surgery 

B.S., Denison 

Riilfiewood, N. .1. 









s*^ ^w^ 





LUCY H. SWIFT 

Pediatrics 

A.B., Columbia 

New York City 



WILLIAM H. TARGGART 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Oberlin 

West Hartford, Conn. 



JOHN A. TAYLOR, JR. 

General Practice 

A.B., Dartmouth 

New York City 



JAMES H. THORPE 
General Practice 
A.B., Haverford 
Maple wood, N. J. 






RICHARD TOBIN 

Surgery 

A.B., Dartmouth 

South Orange, N. J. 



ERNEST E. TUCKER, JR. 

Psychiatry 

A.B., Columbia 

New York City 
















v 



1 



/ 



JAMES H. TERRV 


JR. 


FRANCIS T. THOMAS 


HOWARD K. THOMPSON, JR 


Surgery 




Internal Medicine. 


Internal Medicine 


B.S., Arizona 




A.B., Columbia 


A.B., Yale 


Tucson, Ariz. 




Soutlibridge, Mass. 


Brookline. Mass. 





:rnest m. vandeweghe 

Pediatries 

A.B., Colgate 

Oceanside, N. Y. 




■ 






WILLIAM V. VAN DUYNE 

Psychiatry 

A.B.; Brooklyn 

Nassau, N. Y. 



ROBERT VAN HOEK 

Internal Medicine 

B.S., C. C. N. Y. 

New York City 



O 



- 





STANLEY M. VICKERS 

Pediatrics 

A.B., Columbia 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 





JAMES R. WARE, JR. 

Psychiatry 

A.B., Harvard 

Winchester, Mass. 




^ 



V 



LUCILE M. WARE 

Psychiatry 

A.B., Bryn Mawr 

Lawrence, Kan. 



PETER WAYS 

Internal Medicine 

A.B., Harvard 

Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. 






It mp 




FRED F. WHITCOMB, JR. 

Gynecology and Obstetrics 

A.B., Yale 

Omaha, Nebr. 




JOHN C. WILLIAMS, JR 

Surgery 

A.B., Princeton 

Union, N.J. 






BENJAMIN M. WRIGHT 
Internal Medicine 

A.B.,Yale 
Larchmont, N. Y. 



MARVIN P. ZIMMERMAN 

Internal Medicine 

B.S., C. C. N. Y. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



^Jhe ^Jlme ^hrctS (^otne. . . ^Jo ^Jhlnlt of I V (ana ^Jn 



inaS 



Those famous words of ihe Walrus may come lo 
mind as we are caught on ihe brink of a big deci- 
sion — our choice for field of practice. 

Most of us have put off the decision or changed 
our minds many limes. This year it became in- 
creasingly more difficult lo procrastinate. Intern- 
ships were just around the corner and ihe yearbook 
wanted to complete its poll. 

Some seemed to make up their minds with an 
assurance that appalled others. There was much 
fence-sitting and mind-changing but eventually all 
of us made a statement — tentative, of course! 

The preceding pages show the results of the poll 
conducted in February. There was also a poll be- 
fore Christmas. In the three-month interval, six out 
of the 116 in the class had switched 'fields. At this 
rate. . . 





November 


February 


Internal Medicine 


35 


39 


General Surgery 


22 


23 


General Practice 


19 


17 


Pediatrics 


12 


11 


Psychiatry 


11 


10 


Obstetrics and Gynecology 


3 


3 


Pathology 


3 


3 


Maxillofacial Surgery 


•> 


2 


Neurological Surgery 


2 


2 


Orthopedic Surgery 


2 


2 


Pediatric Psychiatry 


2 


1 


Anesthesiology 


1 


1 


Medical Missionary 


1 


1 


Psychosomatic Medicine 


1 


1 




iihu. 




•N 




INTRODUCTION 



For the benefit of our non-senior readers, a 
word or two might be said about the next few 
pages. The fourth-year curriculum was divided into 
a half-dozen two-month periods including group 
clinic; specialties and vacation: surgery and pedi- 
atrics; obstetrics and gynecology; Bellevue chest 
and medicine; and electives. The class was also 
divided, and six groups (A-F) rotated through 
these services. 

Thus, bands of twenty students, more or less, 
were thrown constantly together and travelled 
through thick and thin toward that fast-approach- 
ing goal — the exalted M.D. We thought it might be 
fitting, therefore, to describe our last year by means 
of brief sketches about the members of each of 
these groups. 






' k Ws nol that Plaut doesn't know 
enough — it's just his goddam alti- 
tude!" 



* J F~ 

m \ 



THE TALK OF THE TOVER. 

WAY back last June we asked our man Stanley to keep 
an eye on Group A. He just handed us these notes, 
muttering something about forwarding his mail to the TG. 

July: Dropped in on Group Clinic — worked over by Lou 
Kurke who made a fast diagnosis, something about non 
compos mentis. Said he wanted to consult the great white 
father — took me into an office labeled Doug Richards. This 
expert was explaining something to another chap who I 
gathered was his Uncle Bob. Air getting a bit rarefied, so 
snuck out. 

August: Set out to watch major operation. Got lost. 
Vi ound up in a mob of howling kiddies interspersed at 
intervals by mothers. Found man in white suit named Jack 
Bryant who didn't even have his hair mussed in all this 
rumpus. Got directions to OR from voice behind Ana Cor- 
dero's copy of Daily-Worker. Op in progress — Surgeon Ruth 
Kerr masterfully handling large flat instruments with han- 
dles while her assistants performed menial tasks with knives, 
strings and things. Ulcer hurting — found dining room and 
joined group of residents seated admiringly around Joanne 
Lloyd-Jones — gazed a while myself! 

September: Evening visit to' Bard Hall. Wandered into 
plush library belonging to Bill Van Duyne. The Wares 
were there holding hands and reading Freud. Informed I 
was in Psvchiatric Institute and that Bard was next door. 




Thought this very handy and trotted over. Took express 
elevator to eleventh door to P&S Club Office — woke up Pete 
^ ays and chatted a while. Took express elevator to 3B. 
Found Jack \^ illiams in pool talking to himself about Den- 
ver and mountains. 

Sovember: \\ent to discuss chocolate milk market with 
Jerry Dickinson. Found him in labor room calming down 
Grove Potter, who kept muttering, " 'Now Dactor Patter' — 
that's all I hear." Busy place! Bumped into a huddle of Cy 
Kalechstein. Pete deReeder and Jim Quinn violently agree- 
ing on politics. They showed me the fancy DR equipment. 
Noticed Artemis Damaskinidou finds it simpler to deliver 
babies in the side rooms — quaint! 

January: Drove down to Bellevue — forced off the road 
by a whizzing convertible driven by \^ arner Nash — probably 
preoccupied with wedding plans. Got there and had my 
confidence restored listening to Eric Plaut correct a fellow- 
named Amberson who thought he saw an X-ray cavity. 
Couldn't stand Rudy Klare's pipe tobacco so left to make 

appointment for chest film. 

— Jim and Lucy Ware 







OUR DAY 

by Vivi and Sylvia 

The breakfast club of Section. B 
Consists of John Dijohn and Lee. 
But here are Bob van Hoek and Kit 
Who've come to share the morning wit. 

"Time for class," chimes Vera V . 
Arriving arm-in-arm ivith me (Sylvia). 
"Hurry now, it's after eight 
And only Fletcher's fashionably late.' 
("Hurry up, please — it's time") 

Smith, Cramer, Barlow (front-row boys) 
Recite the morning text with poise, 
And supplement the teacher's pearls 
For Olicker and the back-row girls. 






r«*. 



v>' 










B 



Noiseless and noteless. Horton J. sketches 
His OB professors and other sad wretches, 
While Mo mutters on about horses' heaves 
And mad miscellany, as the class leaves. 

"To clinic, to clinic," cries Clayton DeHaan, 
And quick to his side spring Lee and Dijohn 
"Come Richie! Come Riester! Come Tucker! Come 

Michaels! 
Let's pedal away on endometrial cycles!" 

"To coffee, to coffee and problems profound," 
Says suede-slippered Joel, sexologist renowned. 
And slouching behind him, go two subtler 
Disciples of Sigmund: Lowenslein and Butler. 

("Sylvia, it's clear as can be, 
There's no room left in this field for me." — Vivi.) 

And so it goes throughout our day . . . 

Here's to our six in A. 0. A.! 

Here's to our dentists! analysts three! 

Here's to all twenty of Section B! 

At breakfast, at lecture, at clinic at lunch 

We love them and leave them, this wonderful bunch! 








STRICTLY FROM WINCHELL 

(or Abner Wolffs neuropathology lecture series) 
Attention, Dr. and Mrs. P&S and all the ships at 
sea! Let's go to press ... dateline. New York City 
. . . school's out for Section C of '53 ending 20 
scholastic years with no obvious personality 
changes. Achievements unparalleled. World aghast, 
awaits hopefully. Tho' potential unpredictable, 
characters effervesce. . . . Silent Bob Eddy said to 
be loudest intercubical historian in Group Clinic, 
frequently obviating necessity for fellow clerks to 
memorize history form. Reassuring long follow-ups 
show both air and bone conduction improved in all 
concerned. . . . Thompson Thompson has let more 
blood than any single Oppenheimer in the hospital 
this past year. Between legitimate daily Bl. Vol. 




determinations and illegitimate bleeding he gets 
the R.B.C. (Royal Badge of Curettage) for the 
class. No spotting, Howard, you've a place in medi- 
cine Hang in there, here's news: Haiyim 

Schwarz says he will not go into forensic medi- 
cine. Despite his rare juridical proclivities he 
prefers the bedside to the bar. Can't we mix the two 
a little bit, Haiyim? Spirits fermenti on the rocks, 

please Norman A. Hill has denied that he will 

soon give the Byron Stookey lectures in neuro- 
anatomy. . . . Roscoe denies he's ever been in a 
stuber, however unconcerned he may appear at 



times. His first-born ("one at a time") is nigh. 
Hats off (nothing else) Rose. ... Orchids to Ed 
Maynard. This malnourished "stout fellow" has 
eaten 307 breakfasts in the past year at Murray 
Gilbert Gaspin's exclusive (and moderately-priced) 
Ft. Washington Avenue luncheonette without so 
much as a whimper over the repeated GI dyscrasias 
this friendly place serves without added charge. 
Ed has some sort of record as well as a constitu- 
tion. . . . Jim Miller and Art Phinney have joined 
the thin red line of paternal heroes. Homework, 
homework, homework! Will those guns never 
cease? ... R. Milam: Southern medical research? 
Delightful! Man, you can sit on the edge of your 




plantation porch sipping juleps and have a boot- 
black shine one shoe while you're casually sorting 
hookworms for study from the pure grass beneath 
with your free bare foot. 

The diploma reads (or so I've heard) 

JOSEPH HOMER DIMON, THIRD. 

Salvage class spirit! Catastrophies come. 
Remember the roll call, the name of a chum. 
"Is Demon here?'' — the preceptor's scan. 
"Scootie's on duty" (or out chasing Ann). 
Strike! Unite! Refuse your M.D. 
Til one of our sheepskins reads simply SCOO-T1E. 

Loose, easy-going, blase Fred Whitcomb is by 
far and away our most classical example of oralitv. 
You'll shock to hear that he's foregoing ENT and 





has instead been taken in. so to speak, by the 
"broad" field of the cephalo-pelvic ratio. Some 
women fool you. Fred, but loves always just 
around the corner where you'll be . . . EXCLU- 
SIVE: Franklyn Morton New mark of Englewood, 
X. J.. A.B. Columbia. 1948. was absent from the 
public health lecture on Saturday morning, Sep- 
tember 27. 1952. Hell only be required to repeat 
fourth year. . . . Russ Randall has been secretly 
married to one Lyn Reid for the past nine months. 
Almost everybody knew it. . . . Bill Mohler says he 
definitely will not marry Julie Schoepf. who likes 
anesthesia so much she has recently married a car- 
diologist. Bill, on the other hand, is married him- 




self to Weedie, who has a heart but does not like 
anesthesia. . . . Marvin Skolnick says he wants to be 
a doctor when he grows up. "It's a long, tough 
grind and you really have to really like people a 
lot. I think that being any kind of a doctor is really 
just about the finest thing any man can do.". . . 
Shortly before Ava Cardner and Frank Sinatra 
made up last year. Frank Thomas changed his 
name. He s between pictures now. . . ."Applicants 
must submit a recent 15 x 15 foot candid portrait 
I along with one Japanese two-man submarine, 
complete with snorkel I with each residency appli- 
cation. Interviews, however, will be required only 
of those for whom it is inconvenient or of candi- 



dates who live within three days' flying distance. 
In this way it is hoped there will be fewer inter- 
views.". . ."Heavy Jim Thorpe is not to be taken 
lightly these days. In addition to being our mentor 
in GC (Group Clinic, that is) during the fall, he 
has sold nearly 50 dozen fruit cakes to the Center. 
These cakes are cheap for cakes and, I understand, 
they can be eaten for cakes. . . . Few people dare to 
bicycle across Holland, Belgium and France with 
Biff Pfister. This cyclic windbreaker is dynamite 
when caught up with the far-off lights of Paris. 
Foodless. dirty, broke, the water supply poisoned 
with B. coli, in the muddiest of rain or most 
stifling sunshine, one could see the smooth loins 




of his wet, nude form lunging hopefully up an 
endless hill. Defying gravity, peasant girls and 
electrolyte balance, he dashed on past the canals 
of Delft, the brothels of Antwerp, the cobblestones 
of Brussels, the ruins of Maubeuge. 'til suddenly, 
late one balmy French afternoon, Paris in sight, 
"Let's take a bus from here, Xeels" and we did. 
. . ."^ ell, Aura, it's awfully nice for a visit but I 
wouldn't want to live here." And still. I guess the 
lump in my throat isn t angioneurotic edema. 
The best of luck and laughter to all of you. Pro- 
fessional jealousy must be a post-graduate afflic- 
tion, so don't forget to shorten your drains and 
keep your needles patent. You learned that at 
P&S, remember? 

— Jim Neely 







D 





Fiddle-dee-D 
by Ogden Nalpers 

Ride Shanks with 1'erna five by five. 
Smile Johnson happy bote tie. 

Over the bridge and jar auay. 

If ho is driving the car today? 
Buxom Burnham shake with glee. 
Sappington so sorrowfully. 

Cut a crew-cut. stylish porridge. 

For John Taylor, our Joe College. 
Darling I am growing flop. 
Silver threads in Norm Bank's mop. 

Azure fluid Coodkind moans. 

Thrives Bob Milch on alcaptones. 





Finger Fay in every pie. 

Sip Bradley julep swaggerly. 

Drink to me only with l'ernod. 

Vm fresh from the continent, you know. 
Benninghoff butter-ball take it all in, 
Guardedly, beardedly. stroking his chin. 

Cahill born with silver spoon. 

Underneath a lucky moon. 

Meltzer diamond in the rough, 
Karas hit 'em hard and tough. 

If here's a rhyme that we can borrow 

For Marraro? 




A paragraph for Jerry D. 

A crytogram himself is he. 

A walking ad for Countess Mara, 

And yet to acknowledge his first error. 

Daffy Duhl, self-styled Durante, 
Purple prose that wets the panty. 

The cornlop's ripe and the meadow's in bloom. 

While Edison plays the viola in his room. 
To left oj center. Bryan, Ph.D.. 
And most obligingly, 

yours truly, 

Jos. B. 




STUDENTMANSHIP 
by Bob Leeper 

It has been only recently that American medical 
studentmanship has been even cursorily scrutinized. 
Time will tell whether it will develop into ful- 
fledged MDmanship, a profession whose object has 
been so succinctly defined by the Lancet research 
group as "the art of getting one-up on the patient 
without actually killing him." I have just finished 
interviewing some student investigators and have 
acquired some refreshing new ideas. 

Leader of one brilliant new group is W. Rotton, 
originator of the they-can't-ask-you-questions-if- 
you're-asleep theory. Essentially, the studentman 
must fall sound asleep not more than three minutes 
following the start of any lecture, thus bringing 
the instructor either to suspect encephalitis or else 
to face the fact that his lecture is unutterably bor- 
ing. An offshoot of this group is Hardie et al. The 
motto in the Hardie Laboratory is a direct quote 




Hm 




from an old master, "Si vous n'etes pas la', com 
merit est-ce quils vous peuvent demander?'' Freely 
translated: how can they ask you about Addison's 
if you aren't even there? 

SirCourtland Robinson has refined hisseem-to-be- 
working-on - something-much - more- important tech 
nique and can ploy instantly with discussion of a 
miero-spectrophotometer. 

The intellectual approach, or how to make the 
instructor feel inferior without actually being a 
snob, has been also investigated. This group, which 
feels that the fine arts mention will act as true 
gambit material, is led by the virtuoso of the violin. 
S. Einhorn. Another musician of note who allows 
only the subtlest hint of her ability to escape h 
Miss Swift. 

"Quoting the literature" has been established al 
P&S through the work of such pioneers as R. Beil- 
man. He is also working on giving the right authoi 
but the wrong date of publication as a refinement 




A new and exciting contribution to the whole 
field of studentmanship has been made by Vande- 
weghe and Shekitka. Realizing early that, on the 
whole, the teaching profession had deep-seated in- 
securities concerning its physical ability, these bril- 
liant young scientists have developed to a high art 
the deft ploy gambit of the bare mention of phy- 
sique in any form. A remark concerning last night s 
Knicks game or the meniscus injury Cene suffered 
in the Army game is enough to send even full pro- 
fessors down to ignominious defeat. 

The Poch-Zimmerman group has done some very 
interesting work in the application of gamesman- 
ship principles to studentmanship. The game they 
are currently working with is hearts, and a jaunty 
mention of such a game sotto voce in lecture seems 
:o have some promise as a minor gambit at least. 

One of the latest and finest ploys to be origi- 
nated by modern research is simply called "'the 
substitute." This ploy lor plonk) is an answer for 





i* nSfiWHW* 



many questions, can take over any conversation, 
and is especially important in "interne talking." 
"'When I was at Roosevelt" is a phrase used more 
and more by the upperclassmen. Important workers 
in this field are Terry, Edelman, and Garcia of 
the Roosevelt group and Givan, Krieger and Larkin 
of the Cooperstown Laboratories. 

The old Catling one-upmanship is exemplified 
by the clever Schorr ploy, formerly known as the 
Kross kounter gambit. The quick opening play 
consists of taking out knitting needles with a loud 
rustle one minute after the lecture starts and knit- 
ting steadily throughout the presentation. Double 
clicks may be inserted at especially dull points. 
Catling's principles of attack are also used in the 
studies currently being conducted by Housepian 
et al. Ed H. is noted for his swift attack with in- 
cisive questions about anything but the lecture 
topic for the day, and he's especially devastating 
just before the end of the lecture session. 




Roy McDaniels 



SPORTS OF OUR TIMES 

A few months ago, after signing a few old and 
yel'd contracts in the Dean's Office, f found out that 
we were going to spend the next year in a sect'n 
called Group F. A quick 
run through the rosteF 
makes you think of Sec- 
tion VIII. There seemed 
to be exactly 18 people in 
this strange segment of 
•(5"0\//l^V the population; so what 
I » i '■/ > could be more obvious 

than to split 'em down 
the middle with nine on 
a side and have a good 
baseball game. There's 
open season in the fourth year, you know. 

The team has been pretty hopeless, though, with 
this crew. The only time we could get horizontal 
George Hyde out of the sack was for chow, when 
he exercised that hi-speed water-wheel motion on 
his morning cereal. Art Aronoff's hamsters just had 
to be fed at 5 P.M., and at 5 A.M. birdwatching's 
the thing. Baseball's John Nork has forsaken the 
world for someone named Suzie who caught him 
off base and lured him from the field. Then Stud 
Targgart, out in deep left, jumped the fence and, 
since, has had too many things to do to be on any 
team. 

We thought we could at least count on Bobby 
Goldring to keep up the old morale, but she's been 
using the baton to keep Jim Golub at bay (expe- 
rience gleaned from days with Aisen). Barry O'Sul- 
livan, whose name used to be Al before he met Dr. 
Gellhorn, at first looked promising as a team man- 
ager but he was last seen disappearing down the 



F 



short end of an Erlenmeyer flask, slide rule in 
hand. Stan Vickers didn't even try out for the team 
this year — he enjoyed himself so much in the L. R. 
league with Miss K., he decided never to leave. 
Of course, there wasn't any real reason for serious 
worry — Jack Oppenheimer took care of that for 
the whole gorup. 

The major setback of the season came when we 
lost three good men to another league. These boys 
were playing fast ball one night and when the 
chips were down, Coke McCord and Ben Wright, 
brief case in hand, chased one Bob Leeper down 
the fire escape, naked as a defeathered jaybird. 
Electioneering Gearhart was no good to anyone but 
Ike, of course. The final blow occurred when Dick 
Tobin, Kinsey's right-hand man. changed his de- 
rogatory tune about female M.D.s and took one for 
a wife. 

With all these stalwarts thus gone down the 
drain, the only regulars we had left to count on 
were "Bama Boy Nelson — a heavy-handed slugger 
who can hit in the clinches, especially when it's a 
game of hearts — and Gary Rapmund, who'd cer- 
tainly make the team if he took time off from 
visiting the Canadian Ambassador and showed for 
daily practice. Last but not least, there's Germ 
Grossman, who's a good man to have around when 
the umpires start their discussions. However, all the 
possibilities were nipped in the bud by Judge 
Severinghaus who outlawed three-man baseball in 
favor of a substitute internship at Cooperstown, 
where this whole baseball idea originally got 
started. Aura says, "Play ball, but play it with a 
medical twist." He seems to think we'll all be play- 
ing in bigger leagues next year — here's hoping we 
all bat 1000. 






Will You Ever Forget 

by Neels, Mo et al 



Yale Kneeland's inspiring presentation 
of a case of coarctation? Never forget to 
take pressures above and below! 

"Musical chair" exams in anatomy with 
tagged, twisted fascia to be identified? 

The 10th floor of P&S where "the air is 
wine and the wind is free, but the perfume 
nearly stifles thee"? 

"Never lower Tilly's . . ."? 

Christmas carols in anatomy lab? 

Precious Pierce, our premier president? 

Probing the perineum, some for the first 
time, some for the last? 

The ano-Iacrimal reflex? 

The Cunninghams, who later swapped 
Bard for a Florida motel? 

That there are about 10 cranial nerves? 

Setting up the scopes, lights, and draw- 
ing equipment in histo lab in preparation 
for that morning cup of coffee? 



How a sweet voice told Byron S., "But 
we learned the brachial plexus before 
Christmas, Dr. Stookey"? 

The intensive questioning of colleagues 
by Si Kalechstein for weeks after his room 
was ransacked, littered with lipstick-cov- 
ered cigaret butts and bed suggestively 
dishevelled? 

Dr. Riley's voluptuous neuroanatomical 
drawings? 

The loving cup brimming with profes- 
sional emesis at our first class party? 

Duhl bursting forth at the same party 
to make you "laugh "til your makeup's a 
mess"? 

Ova and ova again with Sam Detwiler? 

The epidemic of appendectomies of Pot- 
ter, Rapmund, Rittner and Thorpe which 
we'd now call appendicectomies? 

That Bob Eddy had the class baby? 

Smoking drums, cannulating cat's fem- 
orals and Magnus' Evans Blue (T-1824) ? 

The dramatic Miller-Thorpe-Ware pro- 
duction in physiology all about oxygen 
transport, with Thorpe pinch-hitting for 
an RBC? 





Clark's lectures and Tony's notes? 

Meltzer (A. 0. A.) shaking a tube of 
aqua regia in biochemistry, which strangely 
exploded in his face? 

The story about Dr. Wang — how he 
asked, "How much blood cat got?" and 
his comment on the answer (8 quarts), 
"What you think — tiger!"? 

Dropping water-filled "balloons'' on the 
girls sunbathing on Bard terrace during 
the thrill-packed spring exam period? 

Ana Cordero rushing through the last 
anatomy exam to get that little band of 
gold? 

Jim Ware's bachelor party, which ended 
up with plates and silver heaved out of 
windows toward Psychiatric Institute, the 
guest of honor comatose, and the rest end- 



"l DtOtt'T 
KMOwl 4>Ri-5 
•HW ONC.Too!" 




ing up on the Queen Elizabeth as a farewell 
party for Errera? 

A summer vacation? 

Harry Rose's quiet voice: "And now 
we're all going up to the 12th floor and 
we're going to have a little quiz"? 

A classmate's answer to the famous, 
"What did you inject into your rabbit?' 
"What rabbit?" 

The look or. your colleague's face when 
you did your first venipuncture? And the 
sight of Joe Alpers after same? 

Flynn vs. Plimpton? 

The nude that was torn from a kaleido- 
scope and place delicately in Jim Terry's 



microscope for all, including H. P., to : 

Laced underclothing, green shoes 
knitting? 



nd 




Cizek's urea cocktail during the famous 
"golden fluid" experiment? 

National Bores? 

Jack Oppenheimer looking for a curved 
needle to do a spinal in a patient with 
scoliosis? 

Grove Potter's hasty departure from 
Bard Hall, and the myriad of legends sur- 
rounding the precipitating factor? 

Rip Van Winkle's Ways, Wright and 
Edison? 

Loeb in diabetes sessions: ". . . and your 
name is . . . Taylor. Great scot, Taylor, 
you've been as silent as the grave!"? 

Jay Goodfriend's immortal blue fluid? 

Fiddle-dee-dee? 

Sleep 0, coffee 1, tea 2, cigarettes D/i, 
exercise intercourse, appetite same, alco- 




344 



£ve«V NIGHT 

W«». 3br48i !? 



hoi when urged? 

The frank, intimate voice of Ax Hill': 

That Bob Leeper is the only studen 
who hasn't missed a single lecture in foui 
years? 

The Knicks? 

Frequent, bulky and foul times on pedi 
atrics? 

The married men who volunteered for 
visit to the Margaret Sanger Clinic? 

The "scandal" about the Omega Club': 

Duhl on ward rounds: "shifting dull 
ness" ? 

The dermatology resident ad nauseun 
at City Hospital with the perversion fo: 
skin lesions? 

Quickly changing your skivies after [ire 
senting to Bobbv Loeb? 






H. P.s little protective soldiers that 
keep our bodies safe from those nasty in- 
vaders? 

The searchlight greeting for late-comers 
to Don King's lectures in cardio-path- 
ology? 

Acanthosis nigricans? 

The orderliness, attention, and coopera- 
tion given Jim Miller in his infrequent and 
brief class meetings? 

The Amoral Choral and Dishwashing 
Society ? 

The day Jack Williams fell asleep on 
the shoulder of a white-haired gentleman 
in a CPC, who turned out later to be the 
head of the Department of Medicine? 

The kick choruses of our first parties? 




APTC«. *UL, HOW MUCH 
CAM OWT»K*! 



The rare day that loose Lee Cowan was 
worried? 

The day Cal P. yelled up at Kicker She- 
kitka in a Flynn-PHmpton conference, 
"Hey, you with the bilateral Rodin!"? 

Roy McDaniel giving Dr. Bauman his 
send-off to the Army, with Joanne giving 
her heart away? 

Dog days in surgery? 

V. K. F.? 

Harsh, blowing, systolic murmurs at 
Bellevue, transmitted all the hell all over 
everywhere? 

Exams? 

Paul Errera — the boy the bacti depart- 
ment couldn't figure out, even after three 
oral (?) quizzes? 




John Dijohn. Dijohn. Dijohn . . . Mar- 
sha. Marsha. Marsha? 

The resounding bagpipes of Coke Mc- 
Cord enlivening the hallowed halls of 
Bard? 

Einhorn's regularly, irregular class 
notes? 

Fay's projects for Joanne: 1) old cheese 
lowered from Bard's 6th floor into her 
second-story window — all done with 0000 
invisible catgut and 2 1 a large firecracker 
with a burning cigaret for a fuse lowered 
in the same manner to spread the cheese? 

Joannes sweet, muffled, ache-e-e-e-eu 
sneezes? 

\S hen Russ came back from his honey- 
moon with his head bandaged and tried 
to tell us all that a dog had bitten him? 



fTrt 




anoThhJ 1 

HAt> »TlU. 
AWOTKCH. eA»« 
<" von vJeoe«6 Rls _ 
*r*6ft«Me with — " 



That if Johnny takes his clothes off on 
the subway at age four, it is perrfectly, 
perrfectly normal — but that if he takes 
them off at age twenty-one: Schiz-o-phre- 
n~i-a? 

Jim Gearhart's placard campaign for 
Eisenhower in a public health lecture 
given by Stevenson-buttoned Goldwater? 

Stan Olicker running away from mother 
with her newborn before cutting the cord? 

How hard it was to pretend you were 
happy to see a long-lost classmate, 
estranged for months by the fourth-year 
curriculum? 

Where you are supposed to intern? 

To do a rectal? 

Rubber gloves? 

P&S? 








HALF OF THE CLASS MARRIED (AS OF APRIL) 







. . . WITH THIRTY-ONE OFFSPRING (SO FAR, THAT IS) 



*< 



■■$ <•' -» 



Nf 



~- - / 1 




^AfmoriQ \_yur (^ladAmaied . . . (/^uddina KJslc 



l f 



9 



\erS 



ALTHOUGH the practice of medicine may 
still be an art. the theory behind it must 
be based on fact and sound reasoning. Indeed, 
the outstanding clinicians of the past spent their 
formative years in the laboratories, emerging 
finally to apply the knowledge gleaned there to 
humanity. In the tradition of Bernard. Pasteur. 
Osier, and Cushing. as well as in the footsteps of 
noted physicians today, the medical student must 
interest himself in at least a few of the many 
problems, unanswered and unanswerable, that 
beset him. And the history of healing abounds 
with the discoveries and contributions of clini- 
cians made when they were but students, often 
shadowing their masters in the brilliance of their 
work. 

Our class is another generation of experiment- 
ers, dealing with more refined methods on even 
more complex problems than their predecessors. 
But the fundamental principles of objective ob- 
servation and sound reasoning remain, wherein 
lies the efficacy of the experimenter. Our equip- 
ment may be the newest money can buy. but the 
thought processes behind our work must rival 
that of a Bernard if our research is to be con- 
sidered important. 

As a new era of progress for medicine dawns, 
classmates take up the challenge of the unknown, 
linking the art with the science of medicine. In 
this adrenal-conscious age, it is fitting that a 
group attack the functions of this gland: Davies 
and Cahill study renal function in adrenalecto- 
mized dogs; Mohler follows acute insufficiency 
in rats on low sodium diets; Oppenheimer and 
Riester test the effect of cortisone in TB menin- 
gitis: and Targgart. Cramer and Bank watch the 
action of adrenal steroids on human neoplasms 
growing in rats. 

Hand in hand with research on hormones goes 
that of a more mysterious problem, cancer. At 
Delafield Hospital, the team of Garcia, McDan- 



iels, O'Sullivan and Xork tested the efficacy of 
calcium EDTA on high blood calcium levels. At 
Presbyterian, Einhorn experimented with nitro- 
gen mustards on liver cells; independently Milch 
and Butler examined the mechanism of meta- 
stases and Whitcomb classified breast carcino- 
mata. 

One of the earliest group interests was blood 
and its properties. Thompson. Williams and She- 
kitka computed its volume by the blue dye, 
T-1824. Meltzer examined hepatic and renal 
blood flow. Maynard and Perna, along with 
Skolnick, investigated the mechanisms of blood 
clotting and immunochemistry. Related cardio- 
vascular problems occupied Aisen with phospho- 
lipid metabolism. Golub with coronary blood 
flow, Schwarz with cholesterol-lipid turnover, 
and Bryan with plasma extenders, especially 
dextran. Goodkind and Zimmerman helped in 
the work on ballistocardiography; Crocker cor- 
related anesthetics with cardiac disease. 

First to break in print in "the literature" were 
Wright and Ways, with their study of iodide 
activity in the thyroid. The latter author then 
combined with Bryant to explore tropical disease 
in the wilds of Dutch Guiana. Other workers 
checked previous experimental results: Rotton 
did a series on quinine ion-exchange resins in 
gastric acidity; Robinson measured prostatic 
nucleoproteins with microphotometry ; Phinney 
explored chronic rheumatoid arthritis; Nash 
tested a new female hormone; Milam worked on 
the epidemiology of TB; and Thorpe correlated 
ESR with brain tumors. Barlow managed to in- 
terest himself in two separate "arbeits," ocular 
sympathetic pathways and blood flow in the 
bladder. 

While our contributions have set no prece- 
dents, have made no headlines, still they repre- 
sent strivings and progress in the scientific basis 
of medical practice. 



101 



Aisen, Philip 
Alpers, Joseph B. 
Aronoff, Arthur E. 
Bank, Norman 
Barlow, Carl M. 
Beilman, Robert L.* 
Benninghoff, Daniel W. 
Bradley. Merrill N. 
Bryan, George C. 
Bryant, John H. 
Burnham. John P. 
Butler, Robert N.* 
Cahill, George F. 
Cordero, Ana Livia 
Cowan, Leland B. 
Cramer, Lester M.* 
Crocker, Julie S. 
Damaskinidou, Artemis N. 
Davies, Sylvia A. 
DeHaan, Clayton R.* 
deReeder, Pierre 
' Dickinson, S. Jerome 
Dijohn, John C. 
Dimon, Joseph H.* 
Duhl, Frederick J.* 
Eddy, Robert H. 
Edelman, Stanley- 
Edison, George R.* 
Einhorn, Stanley L. 
Fay, Gardner F.* 
French, Vera V. 
Garcia, Miguel A. 
Gearhart. James W.* 
Givan. Thurman B.* 
Goldring, Roberta M. 
Golub. James R. 
Goodkind, M. Jay* 
Grossman, Herman' 5 
Hardie, John C* 
Hill, Norman A.* 
Housepian, Edgar M.* 
Hyde. George A.* 
Johnson, Horton A.* 
Johnson, Paul K. 
Kalechstein, Seymour 
Karas, Joseph S.* 
Kerr, Ruth E.* 
Klare, Rudolph E. 
Krieger, Oscar J.* 
Kurke, Lewis 
Larkin. Arthur G. 
Leeper, Robert D. 
Lloyd-Jones, Joanne 
Lowenstein. Jerold M. 
Markowitz, Joel 
Marraro. Howard W. 
Maynard, Edwin P.* 
McCord, Colin W.* 
McDaniel, LeRoy W.* 



Mount Sinai Hospital. New York City 
Sloan Kettering Institute, New York City 
U. of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor 
Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 
Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester 
New York Hospital, New York City 
Roosevelt Hospital, New York City 
Brooklyn Hospital, Brooklyn 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 
Los Angeles County Hospital, Las Angeles 
St. Luke's Hospital, New York City 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. Boston 
Sydenham Hospital, New York City 
St. Vincent's Hospital, New York City 
Mount Sinai Hospital. New York City 
Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital, Hanover 
Bellevue Hospital, New York City 
Strong Memorial Hospital. Rochester 
St. Luke s Hospital, New York City 
Hospital of U. of Syracuse, Syracuse 
Bellevue Hospital, New York City 
Bellevue Hospital, Neiv York City 
Fitzsimons Army Hospital. Denver 
Strong Memorial Hospital. Rochester 
Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown 
Presbyterian Hospital. New York City 
Mount Sinai Hospital. New York City 
U. of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison 
Presbyterian Hospital, Neiv York City 
University Hospital of Iowa, Iowa City 
Roosevelt Hospital, New York City 
Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester 
Roosevelt Hospital, New York City 
Bellevue Hospital, New York City 
Bellevue Hospital. Neiv York City 
Bellevue Hospital, New York City 
Bellevue Hospital, New York City 
St. Luke's Hospital, New York City 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 
University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland 
Bellevue Hospital. New York City 
U. of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 
Maimonides Hospital, Brooklyn 
Rhode Island Hospital. Providence 
Grace-New Haven Hospital, New Haven 
Hartford Hospital, Hartford 
Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn. Brooklyn 
Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City 
Roosevelt Hospital, New York City 
Brooklyn Hospital. Brooklyn 
Presbyterian Hospital. New York City 
Stanford University Hospital. San Francisco 
Montefiore Hospital. New York City 
St. Vincent's Hospital. New York City 
Presbyterian Hospital. New York City 
Bellevue Hospital. New York City 
Presbyterian Hospital. New York City 



2113 Wallace Ave., Br mx 60, N. Y. 

22 Summit Ave., Salem, Mass. 

59 W. 71st St.. New Yrrk 23, N. Y. 

815 W. 181st St., New York 33, N. Y. 

57 Park Terrace West, New York 34, N. Y. 

196-18 90th Ave.. Hollis, N. Y. 

2725 West Drive, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

2844 Carlisle Rd., Birmingham. Ala. 

8 Claxton St.. Roslindale, Mass. 

Tucson Newspapers. Inc., Tucson. Ariz. 

5332 Veronica Ave., Los Angeles 56, Calif. 

126 W. 91st St., New York 24, N. Y. 

Airmont Rd., Suffern, N. Y. 

University Farm. Rio Piedras. P. R. 

1405 Princeton Ave., Salt Lake City. Utah 

142 Robin Rd., W. Hartford 7, Conn. 

Jubilee Farm. Dublin, N. H. 

414 White's Rd.. Lansdale, Pa. 

Dr. Davies' Farm, Congers. N. Y. 

212 Anderson St.. Orlando. Fla. 

126 Cedar Ave., Hackensaek. N. J. 

165 Clover Rd., Grosse Pointe. Mich. 

27 Grove St.. Mount Morris, N. Y. 

Steam Mill Rd.. Columbus, Ga. 

106 Pinehurst Ave.. New York 33, N. Y. 

Old Goodwin PL. Winterport, Me. 

408 Oriental Ave.. Atlantic City. N. J. 

305 Riverside Dr., New York 25, N. Y. 

19806 Winslow Rd.. Shaker Heights. Ohio 

52 Woodcliff Rd.. Wellesley Hills. Mass. 

5 Forest Rd., Davenport. Iowa 

Box 327. San Juan. P. R. 

35 Park St., Montclair. N. J. 

115 Remsen St., Brooklyn 2. N. Y. 

325 79th St.. New York 21. N. Y. 

1160 Park Ave., New York 28. N. Y. 

1421 Campbell St., Williamsport. Pa. 

410 N. Main St.. Naugatuck. Conn. 

671 Hayes Ave.. Youngstown. Ohio 

1340 Observatory Drive. Cincinnati 8. Ohio 

600 W. 116th St., New York 27. N. Y. 

402 Delaware St., New Castle. Del. 

1804 Ridgeway. Colorado Springs. Col. 

1150 Evergreen Ave., Plainfield. N. J. 

2920 W. 27th St.. Brooklyn 24. N. Y. 

108 Myrtle St.. Lawrence. Mass. 

501 W. 120th St.. New York 27. N .Y. 

1162 Stasia St.. W. Englewood. N. J. 

12-27 George St., Fairlawn, N. J. 

161 E. 88th St., New York 28, N. Y. 

150 W. 80th St.. New York 24. N. Y. 

425 Prospect Ave., Lewiston. Idaho 

430 W. 116th St.. New York 27. N. Y. 

531 W. Main St.. Danville. Va. 

140 W. 86th St.. New York 24. N. Y. 

600 W. 116th St.. New York 27. N. Y. 

2 Montague Terrace. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

9822 S. Longwood Dr.. Chicago. 111. 

101-19 Ascon Ave.. Forest Hills, N. Y. 



Meltzer, Jay I. 
Michaels. Richard H.* 
Milam. Robert W.* 
Milch. Robert A. 
Miller. James Q.* 
Mohler, William C* 
Molthan, Marian E.* 
Nash. Warner* 
Neeh '. James C* 
Nelson. I. Armistead 
Newmark, Franklyn M. 
Nork, John G. 
Olicker, Stanley* 
Oppenheimer. Jack H." 
O'Sullivan. Alvin E. 
Perna. Vincent P. 
Pfister. Ronald R.* 
Phinney. Arthur 0. 
Plaut. Eric A.* 
Poch, Herbert E.* 
Potter, M. Grosvenor 
Quinn, James J. 
Randall, Russell E.* 
Rapmund. Gary 
Richards. G. Douglas 
Richie. Robert H. 
Riester, Walter H. 
Riley, Fletcher P. 
Robinson. J. Courtland 
Rotton, William N. 
Sappington, Millard C. 
Schorr, Alice K.* 
Schwarz. Haiyim 
Shekitka. Eugene 
Skolnick. Marvin 
Smith, W. Pierce* 
Stuber. Roscoe V.* 
Swift. Lucy H. 
Targgart. William H.* 
Taylor. John A. 
Terry. James H. 
Thomas, Francis T. 
Thompson. Howard K.* 
Thorpe. James H.* 
Tobin. Richard* 
Tucker. Ernest E.* 
Yandeweghe. Ernest M.* 
\ an Duyne. W illiam V. 
\ an Hoek. Robert 
Vickers, Stanley M. 
Ware. James R. 
Ware, Lucile M. 
Ways, Peter* 
Whitcomb, Fred F. 
Williams, John C. 
Wright. Benjamin M." 
Zimmerman. Marvin P.* 



Presbyterian Hospital, New 1 ork City \\ 
Letterman Army Hospital. Sun Francisco 
Jefferson-Davis Hospital. Houston 
Sloan-Kettering Institute, New York City 
Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital. Cooperstown 
Presbyterian Hospital. New York City 
I . of Pennsylvania Hospital. Philadelphia 
Presbyterian Hospital. New York CiV) 
Cincinnati General Hospital. Cincinnati 
I underbill I niversity Hospital. Nashville 
Colorado General Hospital. Denver 
I . oj Wisconsin Hospital. Madison 
Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City 
Boston City Hospital, Boston 
Roosevelt Hospital. New York City 
Presbyterian Hospital. New 1 ork City 
Presbyterian Hospital. New York City 
Massachusetts Memorial Hospital. Boston 
Montefiore Hospital. New York City 
Kings County Hospital, New York City 
Bellevue Hospital. New York City 
Hospital oj I . oj Syracuse, Syracuse 
King County Hospital System. Seattle 
Bellevue Hospital. New York City 
Murphy Army Hospital. II all ham. Mass 
Public Health Service, Staten Island 



ile Birch Ridge. R.F.D.l, Westporl, Conn. 

12 College St.. Canton, \. Y. 

Fair Meadows. Surry. Me. 

225 \Y. 86th St., New York, N. Y. 

10 Manor Dr.. Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

1026 Princeton Blvd.. S. Euclid. Ohio 

Pembroke Ave.. Wayne. Pa. 

Ill White's Rd.. Lansdale, Pa. 

323 N. From St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

1211 S. 21st St.. Birmingham. Ala. 

232 Ridge Ave., Evanston. III. 

7 N. West St.. Shenandoah, Pa. 

156-08 Riverside Dr.. New York 32, N. Y. 

73 Carnegie Ave., E. Orange, N. J. 

51-34 30th Ave.. Woodside, N. Y. 

Dial Stone Lane. Riverside. Conn. 

14 Monadnock Rd.. Wellesley Hills. Mass. 

Church Lane. Yarmouthporl. Mass. 

2727 W. 21st St.. Topeka. Kans. 

148 Orchard St.. Elizabeth, N. J. 

186 Chapin Parkway, Buffalo 9. N. Y. 

551 W. 174th St., New York 33, N. Y. 

30 Beverly Rd.. Merrick. N. Y. 

2 Clarendon Ave.. Toronto. Canada 

36F Weis Rd.. Albany. N. Y. 

1800 Thousand Oaks Blvd.. Berkeley. Calif. 



Philadelphia General Hospital. Philadelphia 211 E. Palmer Ave., Collingswood, N. J. 



Sigma 



Bellevue Hospital. New York City 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 
St. Luke's Hospital. New York City 
Saginaw General Hospital, Saginaw 
Bellevue Hospital. New York City 
I . oj California Hospital. San Francisco 
Bellevue Hospital, New York City 
Bellevue Hospital, New Y ork City 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 
Hospital oj I . oj Syracuse, Syracuse 
Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital. Cooperstown 
U. of Minnesota Hospital, Minneapolis 
St. Luke's Hospital. New York City 
Roosevelt Hospital, New York City 
Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City 
Bellevue Hospital, New York City 
Strong Memorial Hospital. Rochester 
Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital. Hanove 
Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia 
Bellevue Hospital, New York City 
I alley Forge Army Hospital, Phoeni.xvi/le 
St. Luke's Hospital. New York City 
Bellevue Hospital. New York City 
Bellevue Hospital, New York City 
Bellevue Hospital. New York City 
King County Hospital System, Seattle 
Bellevue Hospital. New York City 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 
Strong Memorial Hospital. Rochester 
Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City 



2077 Crotona Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 

23 Kempshall PL. Elizabeth. N. J. 

2615 Van Dorn St.. Lincoln 2. Nebr. 

R. F. D. No. 2. Booneville. Miss. 

124 W. 79th St., New York 24. N. Y. 

1026 Venice Blvd.. Los Angeles 15. Calif. 

418 4th St.. Olyphanl. Pa 

255 Haven Ave.. New York 32, N. Y. 

63 Otsego St., Canajoharie, N. Y. 

163 Greenway Rd.. Glen Rock. N. J. 

200 E. 66th St., New Y r ork 21, N. Y. 

135 Raymond Rd., \^ . Hartford. Conn. 

PL. Palisade Ave., New York 71, N. Y. 

2250 N. Maple Blvd., Tucson, Ariz. 

602 Main St., Southbridge. Mass. 

43 Allerlon St.. Brookline 46, Mass. 

24 Oakview Ave.. Maplewood. N. J. 

Hanover, New Hampshire 

11 W. 68th St., New York 23. N. Y. 

26 Court St.. Oceanside. N. Y. 

Lords Hill. Nassau. N. Y. 

67 E. 87th St., New York 28. N. Y. 

1269 E. 18th St.. Brooklyn 30, N. Y. 

1 Highland Terrace. Winchester. Mass. 

1 Highland Terrace. Winchester. Mass. 

15 Pinecrest Dr.. Hastings-on-Hudson. N. "l . 

702 N. 56lh St.. Omaha. Nebr. 

125 Indian Run Parkway. Lnion. N. J. 

18 Wildwood Rd.. Larchmont. N. Y. 

119 Church Ave., Brooklyn 18. N. Y. 



*Those indicating an interest in group practice. 



Beryl H. Paige _ Congenital abnormalities 

Joseph Seronde Mechanics of antithrombin 

Harry P. Smith Blood coagulation 

David M. Spain Pulmonary disease 

Edith E. Sproul _ Neoplastic disease 

Wellington B. Stewart Iron metabolism 

Arthur P. Stout ...Neoplastic disease 

Abxer \^ OLF Toxoplasmosis; allergic encephalitis 

Harry M. Zimmerman Neuropathology 

PEDIATRICS 

Hattie E. Alexander Meningitis: H influenza 

Douglas S. Damrosch Tuberculosis 

Richard L. Day Kernicterus; retrolental fibroplasia 

Paul A. di Sant 'Agnese Fibrocystic disease 

Ruth C. Harris Liver function 

Horace L. Hodes ...Virology; diarrhea 

Ru'stin McIntosh Clinical pediatrics 

Conrad M. Riley Nephritis and nephrosis 

William A. Silverman Premature infants 

James A. Wolff Hematology 

Charles L. Wood Infectious disease 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Alfred Oilman Renal transport of electrolytes 

George B. Koelle Histochemistry of cholinesterases 

Harry B. van Dyke Neurohypophysis; adrenal cortex 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Thomas H. Allen Blood volume 

Louis J. Cizek Fluid exchange and diuresis 

Wilson C. Grant Respiratory physiology 

Magnus I. Gregersen Blood volume 

William L. Nastuk Neuromuscular physiology 

John L. Nickerson Ballislocardio graph 

Walter S. Root Effects of sympathectomy 

William W. Walcott Cardiopulmonary physiology 

Shih-Chun Wang Respiratory neurophysiology 

PSYCHIATRY 

George E. Daniels Psychosomatic problems 

William A. Horwitz Institutionalization problems 

William S. Lancford Pediatric psychiatry 

Nolan D. C. Lewis Clinical psychiatry 

Z. A. L. Piotowski Psychological testing 

Phillip Polatin Clinical psychiatry 

PUBLIC HEALTH 

Harold W. Brown Parasitic and tropical disease 

John W. Fertig Biostatislics 

Leonard J. Goldwater Occupational medicine 



THE FACULTY SECTION (Cont.) 

RADIOLOGY 

John Caffev .Pediatric radiolog 



Gioacchino Failla _ _ Radiobiolog 

Ross Golden Diagnosis of neoplastic disea. 

Harold W. Jacox Clinical effects of radiatio 

Morton M. Kligerman Radiotherapy of neoplastic diseas 

Edith H. Quimby Radiological physic 

SURGERY 

Hugh Auchincloss. Jr Breast cancer; abdominal surger 

Arthur H. Blakemore 

Vascular surgery; portal-caval shu 

David C. Bull Peripheral vascular disea: 

Con A. V. Burt ...Colon and rectal surgei 

Henry S. V. Copper Abdominal surgery; herniorrhaph 

Ralph A. Deterling, Jr Thoracic surgei 

Edward J. Donovan Pediatric surgery; pyloric stenos 

Robert H. E. Elliott, Jr Thyroid and spleen surgei 

Jose M. Ferrer Congenital anomolies of the esophag, 

Virginia K. Frantz - Thyroid and pancreatic patholot 

Edmund N. Goodman 

Electrogastrogram; abdominal surge. 

Cushman D. Haagensen _ Breast cane 

David V. Habif Surgical metabolism; radical mastecton 

Harold D. Harvey Abdominal surgery; gastrecton 

Robert B. Hiatt Pediatric surgery; megacoli 

Edward L. Howes Abdominal surgery; gastrecton 

Georce H. Humphreys II 

Cardiovascular surgery; thoracic surge 
Ferdinand F. McAllister 

Cardiovascular surgery; mitral valvuloton 

Herbert C Maier Thoracic surge 

Frank Meleney ..._ Bacilrac 

Richard L. Moore Thoracic surge 

William B. Parsons Abdominal surgery; thyroidecton 

Milton R. Porter 4bdominal surgery; panereatecton 

Thomas V. Santulli Pediatric surgery; bouel surge 

Rudolph N. Shullinger Abdominal surgery; gastrecton 

Edward B. Self Pediatric and abdominal surge 

Lawren'CE W. Sloan Thyroid surge 

Jerome P. Webster _ Plastic surge 

Robert H. Wylie Thoracic surge 

UROLOGY 

George F. Cahill Adrenal surge 

Perry B. Hudson Prostatic cancer surge 

John K. Lattimer Renal tuberculo! 

Meyer M. Melicow Genito-urinary pathohi 



104 




., 



w 



E deplore the trade school attitude, 
was the oft-repeated theme of the panel 
at the Interfraternity Council forum on "Cur- 
riculum Affairs." 

The Bard Hall Lounge was filled with a huge 
crowd of students and faculty who came to hear 
views aired on medical education and the P&S 
curriculum by the panel, consisting of Associate 
Dean Severinghaus and Professors Atchley. Det- 
wiler. Humphreys. Loeb and van Dyke. The 
forum, held on March 12. was planned and mod- 
erated by Frank Xewmark with the assistance 
of Sherwin Kevy and Dick Milward. 

A list of suggestions on curriculum and re- 
lated matters, collected from many of the stu- 
dents, was submitted in advance to the members 
of the panel for discussion at the forum. The 
panel demonstrated an unexpected unanimity of 
opinion on most subjects. In general, it rejected 
all suggestions tending to emphasize practical 
training, maintaining that the aim of education 
at P&S is "to provide an education basic to any 
career in medicine." The emphasis in training 
is on fundamentals, "to indoctrinate a philos- 
ophy and "to teach an approach to the prob- 
lems of the sick patient." "Knowledge will be 
picked up along the way." The panel considered 
at least four or five years of postgraduate train- 
ing necessary before beginning practice. 

One problem made quite evident was the lack 
of personal guidance for the students. Dr. Sev- 
eringhaus. who prefers to handle these matters, 
simply lacks the time to do a complete job. A 
proposal for an assistant to relieve him of some 
of his chores was rejected and countered by the 
suggestion that any faculty member would be 
glad to help students with their personal prob- 



lems. "The doors are always open. ' It seemed 
obvious that while this is nominally true, a sat- 
isfactory basis for students to seek the confidence 
of faculty members has not been established. A 
generally approved proposal was that there be 
more small academic sessions so that students 
and faculty could become better acquainted. Yet, 
it was pointed out. this would be limited by the 
lack of sufficient time and personnel. 

It was generally agreed that the pre-clinical 
sciences could be better integrated with each 
other, but further steps in this direction would 
await the outcome of the integrative experiment 
being conducted at Western Reserve. The plea 
for better correlation of clinical and pre-clinical 
material met with a mixed response from both 
students and faculty, some feeling that the pres- 
ent degree was adequate or even unnecessary, 
and others feeling that emphasized correlation 
and early adequate academic orientation should 
be basic to the entire curriculum. 

One of the proposals that was to be taken back 
to the curriculum committee was a plan to switch 
the three-month vacation from after the first to 
after the second year in order to facilitate better 
jobs at a time when students are in greater need 
of financial remuneration. This plan would in- 
volve intricate rescheduling of the program, in- 
cluding third vear. in order to have the vacation 
during the summer months. 

A moderate share of the discussion was from 
the audience. It was somewhat disappointing that 
many of the students who submitted suggestions 
did not defend them publicly. However, the ice 
was broken, and it is hoped that similar discus- 
sions of the curriculum will be held by the 
students and faculty in a constructive atmosphere 
of cooperation. 



105 



IN APPRECIATION 



Publications are usually produced with the assistance of many who are 
not directly connected with the editorial staff. The 1953 P&S is especially 
indebted to Dr. von Sallmann and his associates of the ophthalmology 
research laboratories for the use of their darkroom; to the administration 
of the school for their fine cooperation; to Angostura Bitters for their 
release of the Virgil Partch cartoon appearing in the senior section and, 
of course, to our advertisers. We appreciate very much the cooperation of 
the many parents and faculty members who boosted our circulation and 
without whose help this annual could not have been printed. We would 
also like to thank all of those students, faculty members and friends who 
contributed articles, photographs, or advice or gave us their welcome 
assistance in any other way. 




























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112 



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113 



THE NEW ENGLAND 
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Special Rate for Medical Students 

and First-year Interns 

$5.00 per year 



Good Luck to the Class of '53 
From a Former Classmate 

CLIFF HOWARD 
The Electronic Workshop 



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114 



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P & S '53 



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